Contact Information

Office of the University Registrar


Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Office of the University Registrar
4301 Jones Bridge Road,A1041
Bethesda, Maryland 20814-4799

Fourth-Year Clerkship Coordinator

Mrs. Xochilth J. Torres
Fourth-Year Coordinator / Registrar Assistant
Phone: (301) 295-3448
E-mail: xochilth.torres@usuhs.edu

Course Descriptions by Department- Military Medicine

MMR4100, Military Contingency Medicine
MMR4110, Aerospace Physical Examinations
MMR4120, Clinical Rotations in Operational Medicine
MMR4130, Clinical Rotations in Emergency Medicine
MMR4135
MMR4140, Medical Toxicology
MMR4160, Military Medicine Research Elective
MMR4170, Emergency Medicine Research Elective
MMR4180, Military Medicine Research 8 Week Elective
MMR4190, Emergency Medicine Research 8-Week Elective
MMR4200, Joint Readiness Training Center(JRTC)
MMR4210, Air Assault School
MMR4220, Airborne School
MMR4230, Cold Weather Medicine
MMR4240, Wilderness Medicine
MMR4250, Diving Medicine
MMR4260, Army Aviation Medicine Primary
MMR4280, USAF Aerospace Medicine Primary
MMR4300, Aviation Psychiatry
MMR4310, Aerospace Neurology
MMR4320, Aerospace Ophthalmology

Course #: MMR4100, Military Contingency Medicine
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students will work with squardron flight surgeons in clinical and squadron activities. Students gain experience in evaluationg and treating patients with common disorders that are caused by or affect functional work in an aerospace environment. Some sites also include clinic time evaluating acute illnesses in personnel on flight status and their families.

Sites: Rotations may be arranged ata variety of sites but require the student to identify a point of contact and have that POC write the goals of the course, describe the student's duty schedule, and agree to complete and forward an evaluation of the student's performance at the end of the rotation. Rotations at sites without a pre-existing memorandum of understanding with USU require considerable lead-time to arrange. All rotations require the pre-approval of the Director of the Clinical Sciences Division of the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine.

Course #: MMR4110, Aerospace PhysicaL Examinations
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students will work side by side with flight surgeons evaluating military aviation candidates and designated aircrew. Disease processess and their impact on aviation safety are emphasized.

Sites: Rotations may be arranged at a variety of sites but require the student to identify a point of contact and have that POC write the goals of the course, describe the student's duty schedule, and agree to complete and forward an evaluation of the student's performance at the end of the rotation. Rotations at sites without a pre-existing memorandum of understanding with USU require considerable lead-time to arrange. All rotations require the pre-approval of the Director of the Clinical Sciences Division of the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine.

Course #: MMR4120, Clinical Rotations in Operational Medicine
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Sites: Rotations may be arranged at a variety of sites but require the student to identify a point of contact and have that POC write the goals of the course, describe the student's duty schedule, and agree to complete and forward an evaluation of the student's performance at the end of the rotation. Rotations at sites without a pre-existing memorandum of understanding with U USU require considerable lead-time to arrange. All rotations require the pre-approval of the Director of the Clinical Sciences Division of the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine.

Course #: MMR4130, Clinical Rotations in Emergency Medicine
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students have the opportunity of additional practical experience in fixed-facility emergency medical care, including initial evaluation and management of patients with acute complaint both life-threatening and non life-threatening. Students work as subinterns approximately 60 hrs/wk under the direct supervision of assigned residents and attending emergency physicians.

Sites: BAMC, DAHT, MAMC, PMMC, SDMC, WHMC, WPMC

Note: Any military or civilian site with an emergency medicine residency program is acceptable. However, arranging rotations at any civilian site without a pre-existing memorandum of understanding with USU is difficult and time consuming. Any elective at a site other than those listed above requires a meeting with the Director of the Clinical Sciences Division of the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine.

Course #: MMR4135
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: To teach students basic helicopter rappeling theories, techniques and procedures as well as familiarization withequipment.

Comments: Results in the award of the Air Assault badge.

Course #: MMR4140, Medical Toxicology
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students will act under guidance of the director, along with faculty members of the Division of Medical Toxicology at the University of California - San Diego. Direct care of poisoned patients and didactic conferences account for most activities. Students will be expected to present short case presentations and brief reviews of selected topics weekly at Journal Club. Students will also be required to take out-of-hospital call every fourth night in conjunction with a toxicology fellow, and will be required to come in from off-campus to see patients.

Comments: Feedback and evaluation will occur informally throughout the rotation while working one-on-one with fellows and faculty. Dr. David Tanen, LCDR, MC, USNR, the Course Director, will complete the final evaluations.

Sites: UCSD

Notes: Other rotations may be arranged at a variety of sites but require the student to identify a point of contact and have that POC write the goals of the course, describe the student's duty schedule, and agree to complete and forward an evaluation of the student's performance at the end of the rotation. Rotations at sites without a pre-existing memorandum of understanding with USU require considerable lead-time to arrange. All rotations require the pre-approval of the Director of the Clinical Sciences Division of the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine.

Course #: MMR4160, Military Medicine Research Elective
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students will work under supervision of researchers in the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine (MIM), Casualty Care Research Center (CCRC), Center of Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM), or Human Performance Laboratory (HPL). Students may participate in an active research project or work with a faculty member to develop their own.

Comments: Conducting an independent project of the student's design is often better done over an 8-week period (see MMR4180), unless substantial work has been accomplished prior to the beginning of the rotation.

Sites: USUB

Course #: MMR4170, Emergency Medicine Research Elective
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Comments: Conducting an independent project of the student's design is often better done over an 8-week period (see MMR4190), unless substantial work has been accomplished prior to the beginning of the rotation.

Sites: BAMC, DAHT, MAMC, PMMC, SDMC, USUB, WHMC, WPMC

Course #: MMR4180, Military Medicine Research 8 Week Elective
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students will work under supervision of researchers in the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine (MIM), Casualty Care Research Center (CCRC), Center for disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM), or Human Performance Laboratory (HPL). Students may participate in an active research project or work with a faculty member to develop their own.

Comments: This course is a continuation of the 4-week Military Medicine Research Elective. Conducting an independent project of the student's design is often better done over an 8-week period unless substantial work has been accomplished prior to the beginning of the rotation.

Sites: USUB

Course #: MMR4190, Emergency Medicine Research 8-Week Elective
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 8
Hours: 10
(Letter/Pass/Fail): L

Comments: This course is continuation of the 4-week Emergency Medicine Research Elective. Conducting an independent project of the student's design is often better done over an 8-week period unless substantial work has been accomplished prior to the beginning of the rotation.

Sites: BAMC, DAHT, MAMC, PMMC, SDMC, USUB, WHMC, WPMC

Course #: MMR4200, Joint Readiness Training Center(JRTC)
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students work with experts in field medical care and gain insight into field medical suport at multiple brigade levels. Students will work as assistant observer/controller, responsible for control of medical support from the combat-lifesaver level to a Forward Support Medical Company (2nd-echelon).

Sites: POLK

Course #: MMR4210, Air Assault School
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 2
Hours: 3
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: During the Combat Assault Phase, students receive instruction on aircraft safety, aircraft orientation, aeromedical evacuations (students are taught 17 pathfinder hand and arm signals), pathfinder operations, and combat assault operations including simulated combat assault aboard UH-60 aircraft. During the Sling Load Phase, students receive instruction on preparation, rigging, and inspection of a M119 105-mm Howitzer, a M998 HUMMWV in two configurations, fuel vlivets, cargo nets, a LMTV, and conduct an actual hook-up of aload underneath a CH-47. During the Rappelling Phase, students receive instruction on tying of the Swiss rappel seat, hook-up techniques, lock-in procedures, combat rappel, and belay procedures. Students will conduct 2 rappels on the wall side of the 34' tower, 9-12 rappels from the open side, and 2 rappels from a UH-60 helicopter with and without equipment.

Comments: Includes multiple written tests, 12-mile forced march with 25 pounds of gear in 3 hours, and other physical assessments. Successful completion results in award of the Army Air Assault Badge.

Sites: FCKY

Course #: MMR4220, Airborne School
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 3
Hours: 4
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: The airborne course qualifies students as static-line parachutists. The course is conducted in a semi-boot camp atmosphere, and all students address the instructors as "Sergeant Airborne". The first week of training is called ground week, when students learn how to do the parachute harness, exit an aircraft, and execute a parachute landing fall. The second week is called tower week. Students practice mass exits from 34-foot tower, landings from the swing-landing trainer, and practice riser/canopy control on the suspended harness for both the T-10C and the MC-1B/C. Students also conduct one drop from the 250-foot tower. The third week is called jump week, when students execute five qualifcation jumps from C-130 and C-141 USAF aircraft.

Comments: An Army PFT is conducted on the first day of training. All students must successfully pass the APFT, or they will be dropped from the course. Successful completion results in award of the Army Parachutist Badge.

Sites: FBMC

Course #: MMR4230, Cold Weather Medicine
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 3
Hours: 4
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students receive formal instruction in winter, mountainous warfare operations and related medical tasks. The primary emphasis is on cold-weather injuries. Class is divided into two phases: (1) classroom lectures with time for snowshoe/ski movement; (2) field training in the mountainous terrain with practical application of what was taught in classroom.

Comments: Location is the USMC Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport, CA. POC CDR Brad Bennett 295-9635, location USMC Mount. Warfare Train. Ctr., Bridgeport, CA

Sites: MWTC

Course #: MMR4240, Wilderness Medicine
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students receive formal instruction in summer, mountainous warfare operations and related medical tasks. The primary emphasis is on injuries common in the wilderness environment. Class is divided into two phases: (1) classroom lectures with practical application; (2) search-and-rescue and CASEVAC exercises, field survival, and general mountain operations training.

Comments: Location is the USMC Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport, CA

Sites: MWTC

Course #: MMR4250, Diving Medicine
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 2
Hours: 3
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: This course will be provided at NDSTC will follow-on-dive operation experience between this command and the Navy Expermental Diving Unit. Opportunities for dive operations at sea and shore exists at both commands.

Sites: NDST

Course #: MMR4260, Army Aviation Medicine Primary
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 6
Hours: 8
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: The Flight Surgeon Primary Course is a 6 week course designed to provide students with the necessary experience, skills and knowledge leading to qualification as an Army Flight Surgeon. The course teaches Army regulations and policy that govern the administration of a Flight Surgeon's Office, the Aviation Medicine Program, and certification of Army aviators for entry into and continuation of aircrew duties at the controls and in the back of Army aircraft. The primary focus is on operational, medical, and physiological problems related to rotary wing flight and rotary wing operations. Instruction includes clinical topics in Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Neurology, Orthopedics, Psychiatry, Ophthalmology, Optometry, Otolaryngology, and Emergency Medicine as it relate to pilots and aircrew and patients for aeromedical evacuation/transportation. Being an operational based medical specialty of preventive medicine, the student is exposed to various aspects of Deployment Medicine, Environment Medicine, Toxicology, Deployment Planning, Staff Operations, Staff Duties, and Operations Order planning. Interspersed with the classroom experience is the opportunity to visit the flight line for demonstrations of flight line operations and flight line safety. The student receives instruction in basic aerodynamics and follows this training by hands-on operation of the UH-1 simulator.

Comments: Students are enrolled in the Army Aviation Medicine Primary course and must complete all the same requirements as Army physicians. Army students who successfully complete the program of instruction and graduate from USU will be awarded the MOS 61N9D, which may lead to publication or aeronautical orders.

Sites: FRAL

Course #: MMR4280, USAF Aerospace Medicine Primary
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 8
Hours: 10
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: The Aerospace Medicine Primary (AMP) course trains physicians to perform the duties of a flight surgeon and to accomplish the objectives of the USAF Aerospace Medical Program. The course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills required for the proper treatment and disposition of aeromedical problems in aircrew members, and for assuming responsibilities as the medical member of the public health, preventive medicine, bioenvironmental engineering, occupational medicine, health promotion, and medical readiness teams. The course is divided into three segements, or "increments." Increment I (13 days) provides a broad-based introduction to sveral key subject areas within Aerospace Medicine. It is heavily weighted in aerospace physiology, mishap investigation, and human factors. Increment II (10 days) involves in-depth instruction in the aeromedical aspects of publich health, prventive medicine, bioenvironmental engineering, occupational health, and medical readiness. Increment III (12 days) primarily deals with ophthalmology, internal medicine, and neuropsychiatry. The last five days of Increment III are devoted to medical aircrew survival training (SERE).

Comments: Students are enrolled in the AMP course must complete all the same requirements as Air Force physicians. They must meet flying class II physical standards. They must have a current, complete, properly certified FC II physical examination on record. They must be willing to participate in frequent and regular aerial flight. The Air Force awards wings only following completion of internship.

Sites: BAFB

Course #: MMR4300, Aviation Psychiatry
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 2
Hours: 2
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students function as externs in a clinic evaluating psychiatric standards in aviation medicine. This clerkship includes lectures and supervised clinical evaluations.

Comment: Location is the Navy Aerospace Institute of Medicine, 220 Hovey Road, Pensacola FL 32508.

Sites: PNMC

Course #: MMR4310, Aerospace Neurology
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 2
Hours: 2
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Students will experience problems related to neurology and internal medicine, which are faced by flight surgeons. Navy standards and the unique physiology of the flight enviroment are emphaszied.

Comment: Location is the Navy Aerospace Institute of Medicine, 220 Hovey Road, Pensacola, FL 32508.

Sites: PNMC

Course #: MMR4320, Aerospace Ophthalmology
Course Type: C
Department: MIM
Duration: 4
Hours: 5
(Letter/Pass/Fail): P

Description: Althoug pathology is limited due to the patient population, students will work in a general ophthalmology clinic with an aviation specialist.

Comment: Location is the Navy Aerospae Institue of Medicine, 220 Hovey Road, Pensacola, FL 32508.

Sites: PNMC