Contact Information

Graduate Education


Mailing Address

Uniformed Services University
Graduate Education Office
Building A, Room A1045
4301 Jones Bridge Road Bethesda, Maryland 20814-4799
 

Contact our Specialists

graduateprogram@usuhs.edu

Telephone/Fax:

Graduate Education Office
Toll Free: (800) 772-1747
Main: (301) 295-9474/3913
Fax: (301) 295-6772

Associate Dean

Dr. Gregory Mueller (Acting)
gregory.mueller@usuhs.edu

Course Descriptions

A complete listing of all course offerings to include a brief description, information on when the courses are given and the number of credits are available below.


ANATOMY,PHYSIOLOGY & GENETICS

ATO1012 MODULE II: CLINICAL HEAD AND NECK AND FUNCTIONAL NEUROSCIENCE
11 Quarter Hours

This is a medical school course in which the graduate students participate fully in classes and labs with the first year medical students. This course integrates neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with gross anatomy of the head and neck to foster appreciation of the integrated function of these structures. Teaching involves a variety of didactic instruction, laboratory cadaver dissections, brain slices, images of histological preparations, and interactive workshops. Grading is based upon written multiple choice testing and practical exams of the laboratory work. Laboratory attendance is mandatory.

ATO510 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY IA: INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
3 Quarter Hours

This course is intended as the introduction to an extended study of the development, form, and function of the normal human body. Covered in a series of overlapping and interdependent lectures and laboratory exercises are Basic Cell Biology, Basic Tissue Types, Core Concepts of Physiology, and Early Embryonic Development. Students are expected to learn how to identify structural components of cells, tissues, and organs, as they appear in the light and electron microscopes and how to deduce, from microscope views (or micrographs) the most likely functional features of the cell/tissue/organ under observation.

ATO511 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY IB: GROSS ANATOMY-BACK, UPPER EXTREMITY AND THORAX
3 Quarter Hours

This course consists of lecture and laboratory sessions designed to study the gross anatomical structure of the human back, upper extremity and thorax. Teams of students will participate in regional dissection of a human cadaver under the guidance of the Anatomy staff. Relevant lectures will be presented by the staff to aid students with dissection and to clarify complex concepts. The course objectives are 1) to ensure that students learn precise and accurate anatomical information by focusing on unique structural features and relationships, subdividing anatomical regions into spaces and compartments, and recognizing important structural and functional relationships; and 2) to ensure that students develop an understanding of the causes and consequences of normal, anomalous, or altered anatomical relationships in order to predict compensatory responses and functional outcomes.

ATO512 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I: GROSS ANATOMY - ABDOMEN, PELVIS, PERINEUM AND LOWER EXTREMITY
4 Quarter Hours

The objective of Anatomy and Physiology Module IC is to ensure that students learn sufficient anatomical detail about the anatomy of the posterior body segments to 1) communicate precise and accurate anatomic information to professional colleagues, 2) establish an intellectual framework for a lifelong accumulation of anatomic knowledge that is broad-based and includes major anatomical themes, and 3) develop an anatomical intuition based upon an understanding of the underlying causes and consequences of anatomical relationships and variations seen.

PYO514 MEMBRANE AND ENDOCRINE PHYSIOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

This course is made up of selected lectures from Introduction to Structure and Function and Physiology II, which are taught to the medical students by the Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics. Instructors are drawn from the Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics and Neurology Departments as well as from outside sources. The course begins in September with basic topics of membrane transport and electrical properties of the cell. It ends late in May with neuroendocrine physiology. Since the course bridges several quarters, you will receive incomplete grades for part of your registration. You will, however, receive feedback as to how you are progressing in the course along the way. A final grade, encompassing the entire course, will be assigned in May and the incompletes will be removed at that time.


DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS

BID510 INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS COMPUTER SKILLS
2 Quarter Hours

Introduction to Bioinformatics Computer Skills is designed to help biologists develop an approach to analyzing and utilizing the large amounts of biological data available in public databases. The course will introduce software tools for biological applications and for explaining information research. It will cover the background of bioinformatics and how tools are best used in the academic research setting. It thoroughly covers Unix, as it is applicable for biological research.


BIOCHEMISTRY

BCO520 (Fall) and BCO522 (Winter)
3 Quarter Hours each

These graduate level lecture courses (BCO520 in the fall followed by BCO522 in winter) are comprised of a series of lectures covering the fundamental concepts of biochemistry and molecular biology. The goal of these courses is to enable the graduate students to gain an understanding of the basic concepts of biochemistry and molecular biology which is essential for their research career in any area of biology These courses assume a background in chemistry and biology. They are for the graduate students in the MCB, EID, Neuroscience and other graduate programs in USU as desired.

BCO521 (Fall) and BCO523 (Winter)
2 Quarter Hours each

These two graduate level supplement courses (BCO521 in the fall followed by BCO523 in winter) run concurrently with the corresponding lecture courses, BCO520 and BCO522 respectively. The goal of the supplement courses is to take the topics covered in the lecture courses to a greater depth in order to bridge the gap between learning the concepts of biochemistry from the text book and applying that knowledge in research and to familiarize the students with the experimental strategies/approaches of biochemistry used in biomedical research.


EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES

EID501 MODELS OF EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES - I
2 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth analysis of the epidemiology of, and pathology and host immune response to selected emerging (and re-emerging) infectious disease (EID) agents. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular mechanisms by which the responsible organisms evokes disease. The relevance of the disease to the Department of Defense will be one consideration in the selection of that EID for coverage in the course. One model EID will be covered in 4 hours (one 2-hour session for each of two weeks). The first 2-hour session on each disease will be comprised of a 30- to 60-minute lecture of the clinical presentation (a case study may be used for illustrative purposes), the epidemiology of the disease, the nature of the etiologic agent, and the host response to infection. The 60-90 minutes will either be a research-based presentation on a topic relevant to molecular pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, vaccine, development, or a series of two or three topics on the state of the research field for that EID. Students will be assigned a review and several primary articles to read prior to the session. The second 2-hour session will concentrate on student presentation of selected basic or clinical science research papers. Each student will know in advance when he/she will be making a presentation.

EID502 MODELS OF EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES - II
2 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth analysis of the epidemiology of, and pathology and host immune response to selected emerging (and re-emerging) infectious disease (EID) agents. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular mechanisms by which the responsible organisms evokes disease. The relevance of the disease to the Department of Defense will be one consideration in the selection of that EID for coverage in the course. One model EID will be covered in 4 hours (one 2-hour session for each of two weeks). The first 2-hour session on each disease will be comprised of a 30- to 60-minute lecture of the clinical presentation (a case study may be used for illustrative purposes), the epidemiology of the disease, the nature of the etiologic agent, and the host response to infection. The 60-90 minutes will either be a research-based presentation on a topic relevant to molecular pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, vaccine, development, or a series of two or three topics on the state of the research field for that EID. Students will be assigned a review and several primary articles to read prior to the session. The second 2-hour session will concentrate on student presentation of selected basic or clinical science research papers. Each student will know in advance when he/she will be making a presentation.

EID503 MODELS OF EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES - III
2 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth analysis of the epidemiology of, and pathology and host immune response to selected emerging (and re-emerging) infectious disease (EID) agents. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular mechanisms by which the responsible organisms evokes disease. The relevance of the disease to the Department of Defense will be one consideration in the selection of that EID for coverage in the course. One model EID will be covered in 4 hours (one 2-hour session for each of two weeks). The first 2-hour session on each disease will be comprised of a 30- to 60-minute lecture of the clinical presentation (a case study may be used for illustrative purposes), the epidemiology of the disease, the nature of the etiologic agent, and the host response to infection. The 60-90 minutes will either be a research-based presentation on a topic relevant to molecular pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, vaccine, development, or a series of two or three topics on the state of the research field for that EID. Students will be assigned a review and several primary articles to read prior to the session. The second 2-hour session will concentrate on student presentation of selected basic or clinical science research papers. Each student will know in advance when he/she will be making a presentation.

EID504 MODELS OF EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES - IV
2 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth analysis of the epidemiology of, and pathology and host immune response to selected emerging (and re-emerging) infectious disease (EID) agents. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular mechanisms by which the responsible organisms evokes disease. The relevance of the disease to the Department of Defense will be one consideration in the selection of that EID for coverage in the course. One model EID will be covered in 4 hours (one 2-hour session for each of two weeks). The first 2-hour session on each disease will be comprised of a 30- to 60-minute lecture of the clinical presentation (a case study may be used for illustrative purposes), the epidemiology of the disease, the nature of the etiologic agent, and the host response to infection. The 60-90 minutes will either be a research-based presentation on a topic relevant to molecular pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, vaccine, development, or a series of two or three topics on the state of the research field for that EID. Students will be assigned a review and several primary articles to read prior to the session. The second 2-hour session will concentrate on student presentation of selected basic or clinical science research papers. Each student will know in advance when he/she will be making a presentation.

EID506 BACTERIAL GENETICS & PHYSIOLOGY
(4 Quarter Hours)

This course is a graduate level course that emphasizes the experimental approaches used to address genetic questions in prokaryotic systems. The students are expected to develop an extensive understanding of basic molecular genetics in prokaryotic systems and learn how to apply experimental molecular genetic approaches to solving problems. Topics will include growth and metabolism of bacteria, mechanisms of gene transmission and inheritance, gene expression and regulation, manipulation of genetic information using a variety of mutagenesis approaches, and experimental approaches to genomic analysis.

EID601 EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES (EID) SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hour

EID seminars provide a forum allowing the invitation of outside speakers, or in-house faculty, to present an EID, or a concept related to EID, for which the speaker is a recognized expert. The main goals are for the students attending the seminars to increase their breath of knowledge in the field and to meet experts in person. In addition, it will provide a model to follow when they have to present data. Seminar will be presented once per month. Seminars are primarily designed for the EID graduate students and fellows, but will be open to all members of the USUHS scientific community, affiliated hospitals (especially NNMC, WRAMC and AAFB), NIH, and Washington Area academic institutions. Attendance is mandatory for all EID graduate students and fellows. The administration of the EID Seminars will be the responsibility of a single faculty member who will serve as the course director, with the assistance of other faculty members as necessary.

EID901 RESEARCH IN EID
Variable Quarter hours
 
Research projects by graduate students will be conducted under the direct supervision of members of the EID Graduate Faculty who will provide guidance and will evaluate student performance in experimental design, conduct of experiments, analysis of data, and preparation of progress reports, verbal presentations, written dissertations, and publications.


INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES

IDO502 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS
3 Quarter Hours

This course will introduce basic descriptive and inferential statistics in the context of psychological and epidemiological research. The course is designed to equip students with strategies for data evaluation and analysis.

IDO503 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
3 Quarter Hours

Experimental design for field and laboratory studies with an emphasis on multiple regression techniques and comparison to other general linear model alternatives.

IDO511 EDUCATIONAL METHODS
3 Quarter Hours

This course facilitates the examination of concepts and practices in the teaching and learning process. It introduces a wide spectrum of instructional methods for adult learners, curriculum development strategies and evaluation methods. The course is intended to prepare students to teach in their own discipline or professional field.

IDO515 GRANT WRITING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
2 Quarter Hours

This course is designed to provide an overview of the grant writing process for graduate students and to enable graduate students to work in an efficient manner to produce a fundable grant/fellowship application. A great grant requires an important question, clear logic exploring that question, and the resources to complete the proposed studies. This course will overview external funding mechanisms, focus on specific aspects of proposal development, emphasize time management, and emphasize the use of colleague critiques in proposal development. Students will be oriented to the NRSA funding program using the PHS398 application to include a section by section review of this application. Students will develop two sections for class credit: Specific Aims section and Background and Significance section. They will also be required to review and critique these two sections of each other's proposals as part of a mock grant review panel at the end of the course and to obtain critiques from mentors. These review activities will serve to highlight the need to use colleagues as part of the proposal development process as well as to understand the criteria used for grant review. Development of career plans, in addition to an understanding of the role of the student's graduate thesis/dissertation advisor, are other key elements in grant/fellowship writing for graduate students that will be reviewed. At the end of the six-week course, it is expected that students will have developed a Specific Aims and Background and Significance section, grasped an understanding of the remaining sections and the process of grant submission, and, with the help of the graduate thesis/dissertation advisor, will complete the proposal and submit it for funding.

IDO530 BIOTERRORISM AND HOMELAND SECURITY COURSE
2 Qtr hours

The Bioterrorism and Homeland Security Course will address multiple aspects of the emerging threat of bioterrorism and the nation’s response to prepare against this threat. Initial lectures will review the bioagents followed by discussions of diagnostics, medical countermeasures, and consequence management of intentionally released bioagents from the local, state and federal (including DoD) perspectives. We will also discuss future bioterrorism challenges and threats.

IDO531 CHEMICAL WARFARE AND CONSEQUENCE MANAGEMENT
3 Qtr hours

The Chemical Warfare and Consequence Management Course will address multiple aspects of Chemical Warfare. Initial lectures will review the agents themselves, potential areas where they may be being produced and the detection methods available. The course will then shift into a thorough review of the planned federal response. The course will emphasize consequence management from the local and state to federal and DoD perspectives.

IDO532 NUCLEAR, RADIOLOGIC AND HIGH YIELD EXPLOSIVES COURSE (NRE COURSE)
3 Quarter hours

The NRE Course will complete the three course Weapons of Mass Destruction series. Initial lectures will review the basic physics of nuclear warfare, ionizing radiation and high yield explosion and then move into discussion of threat assessment, detection, monitoring and personal protective measures. The course will shift into a thorough review of the planned federal response. The course will emphasize consequence management from the local and state to federal and DoD perspectives.

IDO540 MEDICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION
3 Qtr hours

This course provides an overview of the biomedical consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation. The course will describe the current military and terrorist threat and examine recent accidents. Students will learn about the physiological and psychological consequences of radiation exposure and therapeutic approaches to radiation injury. By the end of the course the students will have a broad understanding of the medical sequelae of radiation exposure and how to medically manage casualties. While primarily a lecture course, there will be an opportunity for students to work through the response to two fictional scenarios involving a radiological event.

IDO704 ETHICS AND THE RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH
1 Quarter Hours

Utilizing lectures and discussions, this course will provide participants with an opportunity to review the basic principles for responsible conduct of scientific research. The topics to be reviewed include the rationale for developing and practicing professional values, and the scientist’s ethical responsibilities to society, their research subjects, and their peers. Issues concerning responsible practices in laboratory work, publication, handling conflicts of interest, and confidentiality will be discussed, as well as more general contemporary issues such as how science really works (normal science and “revolutions”, creativity, bureaucracy). Each topic area is supplemented by seminar-style discussion and contemporary readings. Participants (graduate and postdoctoral fellows) will be expected to actively participate in the seminars. Library research will form the basis for the preparation of a short essay on a single topic of interest.

IDO990 ALTERNATE SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES
1-12 Quarter Hours

This course encompasses the scholarly activities undertaken by MD/Ph.D. students during the transition phase of their Program (years IV and V). This course will begin during the summer after academic year III, and students will register for this course each quarter until the end of academic year V. During this time, each student will complete all requirements to be commissioned in the United States military and will be sent to Officer Basic Training as determined by his/her respective service. During these two years, the student will also complete the remaining requirements of the first and second years of the medical curriculum. The student will also continue to spend significant time on his/her thesis research, finalize the thesis project, and prepare and defend his/her doctoral dissertation. The student may not proceed into his/her clinical years (years VI and VII) without completion and defense of his/her dissertation. The student will also complete Operation Kerkesner and be provided an adequate summer non-medical military experience years IV and IV.

IDO999 FINALIZING DISSERTATION
1-12 Quarter Hours

Research for the completion of the dissertation.


MEDICAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

MPO301 MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY I: ORGANIZATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL
3 Quarter Hours

This course will provide a review of general principles and techniques in organizational psychology/industrial psychology with a particular focus on their application to the military workplace. Topics include selection, classification and placement in military services, human factors related to military performance, environmental factors affecting military performance, leadership, and individual and group behavior. The specific aim of this course is to provide the student with a review of theoretical models of organizations and person x environment interactions to facilitate optimal performance within a military environment.

MPO401 CLERKSHIP I
1-12 Credit Hours

This is a required course for all first-year clinical psychology students. The course will consist of 20 hrs/wk of supervised clinical service at a military teaching hospital. Students will obtain experience in assessment, case conceptualization and treatment.

MPO402 CLERKSHIP II
1-12 Quarter Hours

This is a required course for all second-year clinical psychology students. The course will consist of 20 hrs/wk of supervised clinical service at a military teaching hospital. Students will obtain experience in assessment, case conceptualization and treatment.

MPO403 CLERKSHIP III
1-12 Quarter Hours

This is a required course for all third-year clinical psychology students. The course will consist of 20 hrs/wk of supervised clinical service at a military teaching hospital. Students will obtain experience in assessment, case conceptualization and treatment. This clerkship will involve the application of more complex assessment and treatment approaches.

MPO410 CLINICAL SKILLS TRAINING SEMINAR I
2 Quarter Hours

This course is designed for second-year clinical psychology and medical/clinical psychology graduate students, and is the first in a series of two courses designed to further integrate practice-specific training with didactic work. These training seminars are designed to better prepare students for their applied practica experiences that are geared toward psychological assessment activities and the administration of various psychotherapy approaches, and for their future professional work as military or civilian psychologists. Seminar I is taken during the fall, winter, and spring of the student’s second year. To enhance overall learning, skill development, and general clinical efficacy, this course coordinates with topics presented in the Psychotherapy Fundamentals courses.

The structure of Seminar I allows for immediate application and discussion of the didactic concepts and techniques as they are presented in the foundation series. Students learn to apply specific clinical skill modalities through in-vivo training at the NCA Medical Simulation Center. Specifically, students take on a simulated caseload of three patients at the Simulation Center that they see on an ongoing basis during the year. Students are coached by the instructor, and receive feedback from their peers, the course instructor, and the standardized patients at the Simulation Center. In classroom roleplays give students additional opportunities to fine-tune specific clinical skills. In addition, relevant readings, prepared case studies, and students’ current cases serve as the basis for lively class discussions.

MPO411 CLINICAL SKILLS TRAINING SEMINAR II NUMBER
2 Quarter Hours

This course is designed for third-year clinical psychology graduate students and is the second in a series of two courses designed to further integrate practice-specific training with didactic work. The course is taken during the fall, winter, and spring of the student’s third year. These training seminars are designed to better prepare students for their applied practica experiences that are geared toward psychological assessment activities and the administration of various psychotherapy approaches, and for their future professional work as military psychologists. Students learn to apply a wide repertoire of clinical skills to specific patient populations as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) diagnoses.

Integral to the course, students take on a simulated caseload of three patients at the NCA Medical Simulation Center, and see these patients on an ongoing basis during the year. Students are coached by the instructor, and receive feedback from their peers, the course instructor, and the standardized patients at the Simulation Center. In classroom role-plays give students additional opportunities to fine-tune specific clinical skills. In addition, relevant readings, prepared case studies, and students’ current cases serve as the basis for lively class discussions.

MPO501 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL PSYCHOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

Medical psychology is the study of behavior and mind as it relates to physical and mental health. This course is designed to provide an understanding of specific topics and issues that dramatically affect health, illnesses, and the practice of medicine. The lectures and discussions focus on clinically relevant topics that reflect central psychological principles and evidence.

MPO505 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

This course covers social psychology, with an emphasis on those areas that are applicable to understanding the etiology and treatment of illness as well as maintenance of health. Topics include group dynamics, social comparison, affiliation, cognitive dissonance, attitude formation and change, and attribution theory.

MPO506 PERSONALITY AND HEALTH
3 Quarter Hours

This course will consider the role of personality factors and individual differences in susceptibility to illness, behavior, coping, and steps that people take to assure their health.

MPO509 APPETITIVE BEHAVIORS
3 Quarter Hours

Appetitive behaviors include behaviors that are positively reinforcing, physiologically, and psychologically. The course concentrates on psychological aspects of these behaviors and on biological aspects which are inseparable from psychological factors. Emphasis is placed on experimental findings.

MPO511 PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

Psychopharmacology is an in depth investigation of the effects of drugs relevant to behavior and mental health. This course includes detailed discussions of basic topics in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry and experimental psychology relevant to basic and clinical psychopharmacology.

MPO513 PHYSIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR
Variable Quarter Hours

Included in this course will be discussion of the structure and function of the nervous system and physiological mechanisms underlying psychological linkages with the cardiovascular system. Also, psychoendocrinological function will be considered. The interrelationship of these specific subsystems to behavioral functioning will also be explored.

MPO515 BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN CHRONIC DISEASES
3 Quarter Hours

Consideration of psychological and behavioral factors in the etiology, progression, and treatment of the major cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Included will be discussion of the role of critical life events; particular behavior patterns and traits(e.g., depression) psychosocial aspects of cardiac rehabilitation; coping with the stresses of illness; and problems of medical compliance for the patient with chronic illness.

MPO527 ETHICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

This course will introduce students to ethical standards for professional psychologists. Special emphasis will be placed on the APA's revised ethical standards, as they relate to clinical practice. Ethical standards and ethical dilemmas within military settings will be highlighted.

MPO528 THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF INTERVENTION
3 Quarter Hours

This course will introduce students to theoretical methods of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy. The course will focus on cognitive-behavioral interventions for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, and health related problems.

MPO529 FOUNDATIONS OF INTERVENTION: COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY I
3 Quarter Hours

This course introduces the student to the theory and practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Empirically supported CBT interventions for specific psychiatric problems including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders, and substance use disorders will be reviewed. Through participation in course lectures and discussion as well as role playing exercises, written assignments, and watching of tapes of master clinicians, students will gain the skill necessary to decide upon appropriate assessment methods, to develop cognitive behavioral case conceptualizations, to utilize techniques of CBT, and to evaluate progress in treatment.

MPO530 FOUNDATIONS OF INTERVENTION: GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY
3 Quarter Hours

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of group psychotherapy. The course consists of didactic material, video presentations, and experiential exercises. Special attention will be given to an examination of out-patient therapy groups, in-patient therapy groups, and time-limited psycho-educational groups. Class readings and video presentations provide the material for class discussion and participation in group exercises. Students are required to develop a written proposal for a time-limited therapy group. An oral presentation of this proposal is also required.

MPO533 NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

This course is designed as an introduction to Neuropsychological theory and will provide an overview of the empirical and clinical findings that have contributed to current knowledge of the relationship between brain functioning and human behavior. The first part of this course will review the antecedents that led to the interest in brain-behavior relationships. The remainder of the course will emphasize specific relationships between structural neuroanatomic and functional cognitive/behavioral changes associated with clinical neurological conditions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the functional cognitive and behavioral manifestations of disrupted neural systems in humans. By the end of this course, students will have acquired: 1) an understanding of neuropsychological theory, 2) knowledge of prevalent clinical neuropsychological conditions, and 3) awareness of scientific research methods used to evaluate brain-behavior relationships.

MPO534 PLANNING, IMPLEMENTING AND EVALUATING HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAMS
3 Quarter Hours

This course will review the process of development and evaluation of human service programs. Principles and techniques of program development, outcomes research and cost-benefit analyses will be reviewed. Methods to communicate results and mobilize organizational change based upon findings will also be highlighted.

MPO535 PREVENTION & TREATMENT OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE/ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS
3 Quarter Hours

This course is designed to promote a thorough understanding of substance use, abuse, and treatment from a biopsychosocial perspective. A descriptive overview of the problem of substance abuse and dependence will focus on patterns of use for particular substances among different subgroups. Major theories of addictive behaviors are examined along with the treatment approaches following from these theories. Treatment of addictive behaviors within the context of other disorders and within the context of the family system is examined. Large scale and individual prevention strategies are reviewed (with particular emphasis on problems within the military). Students are expected to understand prevalence and treatment of addictive behaviors within a biopsychological context.

MPO537 CLINICAL ASSESSMENT: I
5 Quarter Hours

This class is required for all first year clinical students in the Clinical Psychology program in preparation for year-one clerkships. The course will cover basic interviewing techniques & strategies for structured & semi-structured interviews in clinical practice. Students will also receive specialized instruction in cognitive and behavioral interviewing and case conceptualization. Students will complete several interviews in simulated clinical settings. The second have of this course will introduce students to the major techniques involved in intellectual assessment.

MPO538 CLINICAL ASSESSMENT: II
5 Quarter Hours

This course is an introduction to the major techniques of objective and projective psychological assessment. The student is expected to develop a basic understanding of two major areas of psychological testing: intellectual evaluation and personality assessment. In addition ,a brief introduction to neuropsychological assessment is provided. This course presents the basic clinical knowledge and strategies necessary for the competent use of the more widespread and important tests in adult clinical psychology with emphasis on rationale, range of applicability, administration, and scoring. In addition, students will be expected to demonstrate a basic understanding of interpretation and integration of information from various sources.

MPO544 AMBULATORY ASSESSMENT IN BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE
3 Quarter Hours

The objectives of this course are for the students to: (1) understand the use of ambulatory monitoring techniques for assessments of psychological, behavioral, and physiological variations during daily life activities; (2) learn how to apply these techniques using ambulatory assessment tools (e.g., computer-based diaries, automated activity monitors, ECG, blood pressure, salivary cortisol); (3) become familiar with data-reduction techniques for ambulatory assessments. Each class has a theoretical and clinical implications part and all class participants will have practical exposure to the monitoring techniques.

MPO545 PSYCHODYNAMIC, EXPERIENTIAL AND INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY
3 Quarter Hours

Using a seminar approach with student presentations, class discussions, lecture presentations, videos, and in-class experiential exercises will be used as appropriate. Guest speakers may be invited to address particular topics. Class participation is critical.

MPO560 INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE ENVIRONMENT, BEHAVIOR & NEUROBIOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

The objective of this course will be to lean how the environment, behavior, and neurobiology influence each other using specific disease states as examples. In particular, the course will focus on: how an organism’s environment and behavior alter its nervous system structure and function and how an organism’s environment and biology of the nervous system affect its behavior. Students will gain an appreciation for the complex and interactive psychobiology of prevalent and costly disease states.

MPO605 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY/BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE SEMINAR
3 Quarter Hours

Provides seminar adjunct to the lecture Introduction to Med Psy Course designed for graduate students and others who are interested pursuing advanced study in this field. The primary goal is to enable students to read and evaluate current research in their field.

MPO901 RESEARCH METHODS & COMPLEX HUMAN EXPERIMENTATION I
3 Quarter Hours

This course will consider techniques and procedures for designing, executing, and analyzing experiments on complex processes with human subjects. Laboratory models, field studies, and other settings will be covered, and class exercises will emphasize applied research design and critical reading of existing studies.

MPO902 RESEARCH METHODS & COMPLEX HUMAN EXPERIMENTATION II
3 Quarter Hours

Continuation of Research Methods & Complex Human Experimentation I.


MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

MCO301 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY
4 Quarter Hours

This introductory course provides a basis of fundamental concepts in immunology and microbiology. The immunology section covers the structure and function of the immune system, including the components of the innate and adaptive immune systems, with an emphasis on the host response to pathogens as well as diseases associated with misdirected immune reactions. The microbiology portion of the course teaches the basic biology of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents and highlights the importance of microbes in health and disease. The epidemiology, host response, virulence properties, and laboratory characteristics of several important agents in each category are discussed as are concepts of disease prevention and antimicrobial therapy.

MC0501 MOLECULAR VIROLOGY 4 Credit hours
(alternate years)

Virology occupies a unique position in modern biology. Many of the most common, and the most deadly, human pathogens are viruses. The advent of the AIDS epidemic, recent outbreaks of emerging viral diseases, such as Ebola, influenza, and West Nile virus, and the threat of bioterrorism, have led to an increasingly important role for the study of viruses in biomedical research. In addition to their roles in causing human diseases, viruses have also served as important model systems for understanding cellular processes at the molecular level. As viruses are dependent on host cells for almost all aspects of their life cycles, the mechanisms and principles governing viral and cellular replication and gene expression are nearly identical. The small genome sizes of viruses in particular render them highly amenable to experimental manipulations. Thus, many of the most fundamental discoveries about cellular processes such as mRNA splicing, mRNA transcription, DNA replication, oncogenic transformation, cell cycle control, and tumor suppression, to name just a few, have been elucidated in viral systems first. Viruses themselves are now being used as vehicles for the intracellular transfer of genes (gene therapy) and as important tools for vaccine development. The purpose of this course is to cover recent advances in virology and to develop within the students skills in (1) presentation of research results, and (2) critical thinking and evaluation of data from current literature.

MCO502 PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY
4 Quarter hours (alternate years)

Pathogenic Bacteriology focuses on mechanisms utilized by bacteria to establish infection and cause disease. The course is offered every other spring semester (years 2003, 2005, 2007, etc.), and meets three days a week (M, W & F, 0830-1030). Topics relevant to the field of bacterial pathogenesis are taught using a format in which lectures are presented by departmental faculty or invited speakers from outside of the University. Lectures are based on pre-assigned research articles pertinent to the topic at hand (Mondays and Wednesdays). Tutorial sessions are given on Fridays in which the topics of the week are reviewed and scientific papers are presented by students to promote discussion. In lieu of a midterm examination, students are required to write and submit a short research proposal on a research question that is relevant to bacterial pathogenesis. After receiving written feedback from the faculty, students present their revised proposals to the class to gain experience in orally defending a research plan. A comprehensive written examination of the material presented in the course is given at the end of the course. Final grading is based on class participation, student presentations, the written research proposal, and performance the final exam. Assigned text: Principles of Bacterial Pathogenesis (Ed: Eduardo Groisman)

MCO503 CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY
4 Quarter hours (alternate years)

This advanced course is designed to extend student’s knowledge in the major areas of Immunology: molecular immunology, immunogenetics, and cellular immunology. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding and interpretation of original papers. The course will be presented as a combination of lectures given by the faculty/guest lecturers and seminars in which original papers will be read and discussed by all participants.

MCO506 PROKARYOTIC & EUKARYOTIC CELL BIOLOGY & GENETICS
6 Quarter hours (alternate years)

This course is designed to provide the student with a broad introduction to the molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells using a literature-based format. Students will be assigned the responsibility for critically reading published scientific papers dealing with a wide variety of topics; particular emphasis will be placed on the cell biology and genetics of bacteria and yeast. Class sessions will primarily involve student presentations concerned with discussion and analysis of the data contained in these papers.

MCO601 FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY
1 Quarter Hour

Guest speakers, faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students will present weekly seminars on selected topics in Microbiology & Immunology based on their own research.


MILITARY AND EMERGENCY MEDICINE

MEM901 RESEARCH IN APPLIED HUMAN BIOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

Supervised research with individual faculty members of the Program. This course may be taken in each quarter in which a student is registered in the Program.


MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY

MCB502 MCB JOURNAL CLUB
1 Credit Hour

MCB Journal Club meets weekly for one hour during Fall, Winter and Spring. Journal Club is designed to providez students with experience in (1) critically analyzing the primary scientific literature and (2) presenting a research talk to a diverse audience. Students typically give 2 presentations per year, at least one of which must be a journal article. Students who have advanced to candidacy may choose to discuss their own research for the second presentation.

MCB503 GENETICS
4 Credit Hours

The students are expected to develop a rudimentary knowledge of classical genetics and an extensive understanding of molecular genetics. Course material includes experimental approaches to genomic analysis and the mechanisms of transmission, expression, and manipulation of genetic information. This course is a graduate level course that will emphasize the experimental approaches used to address genetic questions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems.

MCB509 CELL BIOLOGY
6 Credit Hours

This course covers all aspects of cell biology from organellar structure and function to processes like bioenergistics, vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, cell-cell contact, etc. The course is team taught with instructors from USU, the NIH, and Walter Reed, that are usually experts in their lecture topic.

MCB520 CURRENT CONCEPTS IN NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY AND ENDOCRINOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

In-depth readings in the neuroendocrinology and endocrinology primary literature. Taught in a modular format, discussions will be based on the faculty’s area of research expertise. The student will be expected to read the most current and relevant primary literature in the subject area and be able to critique each paper discussed in class.

MCB530 ALTERATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS IN DISEASE
2 Quarter Hours

The objective of the course is to acquaint students with signal transduction mechanisms that regulate cell growth. A specific focus of the course will be the effect of aberrant signaling on loss of growth control and development of disease pathology. The course will consist of a combination of lecture and discussion of primary literature. In addition, there will be opportunities to attend and discuss research seminar presentations by guest speakers who are experts in the field. Requirements include a background in Molecular Biology and Cell Biology or Pathology.<

MCB601 SEMINARS IN MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY
1 Credit Hour per 2 quarters
 
The course objective is to provide an indepth understanding of experimental approaches to Molecular Cell Biology. Lectures by faculty, graduate students and invited speakers will be presented twice each month throughout the Fall, Winter and s. Note that the course may be taken repeated, as the topics are continually changing. Thus, in 2 years, a student would earn 3 credits.

MCB701 TUTORIAL IN MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY
1-4 Credit Hours

Students who wish to undertake supervised study in specific areas of Molecular and Cell Biology may register for this course with the approval of the instructor (a member of the MCB Graduate Program faculty) and the students advisor. The instructor, advisor and student will establish goals for the tutorial prior to the beginning of the course. The tutorial may be conferences, literature study, student presentations, laboratory exercises or any combination of these factors.

MCB801 TECHNIQUES USED IN CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
4 Credit Hours

This course is intended to give the students an overview of the different techniques used in research laboratories. The basic principles of protein and DNA-related techniques will be explained and several examples will be discussed.

MCB901 RESEARCH IN MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY
1-12 Credit Hours

Each graduate student in the MCB program will be required to take three laboratory rotations in a research laboratory, supervised by a faculty member of the MCB program, by January of their second year. The rotations will begin in January of the first year. The rotations will be chosen by the student and are subject to approval by the supervising faculty member and the temporary advisory committee. Each lab rotation will be no more than 12 weeks long and each student is expected to spend a minimum of 12 hours per week in the lab, in addition to enrollment and attendance in scheduled graduate courses. At the completion of each rotation, the student must summarize his/her research efforts either by an oral or written presentation. The formal of the presentation will be determined by the faculty rotation advisor. Requests for exceptions to these requirements will be considered on an individual basis by the temporary advisory committee.

MCB902 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH
1 Credit Hour

The objective of this course is to acquaint students with the research programs of MCB faculty, thereby allowing students to make informed choices in the selection of laboratories in which to perform required research rotations. The course consists of an introductory session in which criteria for evaluating research programs and selecting laboratories in which to perform dissertation research are discussed. Thereafter, sessions will consist of faculty research presentations, and discussion of faculty research papers. Students will be expected to have read at least one paper prior to each faculty research presentation.

MCB904 INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS
2 Credit Hours

The principle objective of bioinformatics is to find the relationships between DNA and protein sequence on the one hand, and biological function and disease on the other. Bioinformatics is the application of computer science and information technology to the field of biology and medicine. The goal of this course will be to give students overviews and practical application skills in the following topics: databases, sequence alignment, gene and regulatory sequence recognition, Perl, Bioperl, R, and Bioconductor programming, and Linux for Biologists. Students will be able to immediately start using these tools, or to move on to courses or tutorials at higher levels.


NEUROSCIENCE PROGRAM


PATHOLOGY

PA0501 TOPICS IN GENERAL PATHOLOGY
3-5 Quarter Hours

This course will provide an introduction to general pathological processes and reactions. Tissues and organ alterations in disease states common to large portions of the body are covered. Both gross and microscopic as well as dynamic aspects of disease are included.

PA0502 TOPICS IN PATHOGENESIS
3-4 Quarter Hours

Mechanisms and concepts of pathogenesis will be illustrated through in-depth study of selected human diseases involving processes of neoplasia, inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, viral infection immune-dysfunction and auto-immunity. Faculty lectures will provide an overview and conceptual framework. In a series of complementary conference/seminars, centered around each disease, data from the fields of medical genetics, epidemiology, microbiology, and cellular or molecular pathology will be integrated and subjected to critical analysis. When relevant, experimental animal models will also be introduced. Students will participate actively in the conference/seminars and prepare essays based upon readings of original research papers or current literature reviews.

PA0503 INTERFERONS
3 Quarter Hours

The course will discuss the following subjects related to interferons and interferons-inducer studies: Structure; purification methods; inducers; mechanisms of production and action; antiviral activity in animals; clinical potential; biological significance; effects on the immune system; and cell growth inhibitory activity.

PA0506 PATHOLOGY OF ORGAN SYSTEMS
1-9 Quarter Hours
 
Study of the pathology of specific organ systems. This course will be offered in conjunction with the Pathology course for second year medical students.

PA0510 MECHANISMS OF GROWTH CONTROL NEOPLASIA
4 Quarter Hours

The objective of the course is to acquaint students with genetic and biological mechanisms by which cell growth is altered during the development of neoplasia. The Effect of loss of growth control on the development of specific pathology will be discussed. The course will consist of a combination of lecture, discussion of primary literature and presentation of research data by guest speakers, who are experts in the field. Requirements for enrollment include a background in Molecular and cell Biology or Pathology.

PA0520 HISTOLOGY FOR PATHOLOGISTS
2 Quarter Hours

A basic histology course for students pursuing advanced degrees in pathology. Basic tissue histology and organ systems will be covered utilizing a lecture and “hand on” multi-headed microscope format. Eleven segments will focus on common microscopic features of normal tissues and organs. Appropriate special histochemical stains will be used to illustrate the appearances of normal histologic landmarks. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to better understand basic pathologic processes.

PA0530 MEDICAL LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS AND PATHOLOGY OF BIOLOGICAL THREAT AGENTS
3-4 Quarter Hours

This course will address pathobiological, biochemical, molecular, and medical laboratory features of living agents or organic products of potential use in warfare, terrorism. or criminal activities. Students will gain an appreciation of the scope of biological agents and their potential for deployments against humans, animals, and plants. the clinicopathologic presentation of biological toxins and chemical agents will be compared and contrasted. Environmental issues that make certain agents special threats in particular geographic locations will be discussed. Lectures will detail mechanisms involved in the spread of microbial organisms of toxins, routes of host entry, the pathophysiology of host reactions, and the specific cellular, biochemical, and molecular pathology in target organs. Laboratory diagnosis and forensic investigation also will be emphasized. Attention will be drawn to relevant aspects of prophylaxis and therapeutics. Students will be taught to distinguish the properties of agents or organic products that represent dangers as strategic and tactical weapons of warfare from those with properties more suited to use in bioterrorism or crime. Instruction will include case studies and laboratory sessions to explore relevant tissue findings and agent detection techniques. Sessions will be designed to allow for student participation in case analyses. Means for rapid and accurate clinicopathologic diagnosis will be emphasized. Throughout this course, students will be informed of current efforts to prevent, contain or counter the terrorist and criminal uses of biological weapons. This will include issues of decontamination, detection of arsenals, and verification of weapon destruction. Although many specific strategies are classified, students can be familiarized with some of the resources available to the military in preparing operations for a threat environment.

PA0531 CRITICAL MODELS OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES: PATHOLOGY AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS
4 Quarter Hours

Through a series of lectures, case presentations and laboratory demonstrations by staff, the student will examine a series of 35-40 specific infectious diseases with an emphasis on the pathology of the disorders and the molecular pathologic techniques useful in their diagnosis. Each specific infection will be studied by examining its 1.) clinical and epidemiologic features, 2.) “classical” gross and microscopic morphology, 3.) molecular pathology, 4.) and, if applicable, animal models. Recent changes in the organism will be discussed as they effect the pathologic features. Comparison with closely related diseases will emphasize the differential diagnostic features. Case oriented discussions by students will include examination of gross and microscopic pathology materials.

PA0540 THE SCIENTIFIC, DOMESTIC, AND INTERNATIONAL POLICY CHALLENGES OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION AND TERROR PART II: NUCLEAR, RADIOLOGICAL, HIGH EXPLOSIVES, AND TOXIC CHEMICAL AGENTS
3-4 Quarter Hours

This course will address technical and policy issues associated with weapons, which may be used in warfare, terrorist actions, or criminal activity. The information on the agents covered within this course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) when combined with the companion course on biological weapons and biological terrorism, "The Scientific, Domestic and International Policy Challenges of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Terror Part 1: The Emerging Threat of Biological Weapons and Bioterrorism." Students will learn how and why distinctions are made between each of the types of devices, such as nuclear versus radiological and chemical versus biological. They will have expert instruction on the physical and chemical effects of each type of weapon and their medical consequences. Information on the current state of the art for detection and containment of the hazards pre- and post-use of these weapons will be presented. An important aspect will be describing the medical effects of each modality. Information will be provided on treatments and therapies that currently exist and the research that is being conducted to improve treatment modalities. The available means of protection pre- and post incident, both for personnel who must respond to these hazards and measures to protect the general public and property will be explored. The concept and importance of psychological casualties and measures that can or should be taken will also be presented. Many of these agents have severe environmental consequences, which will also be discussed. The course will also address geopolitical and domestic legal issues associated with prevention and response to WMD incidents. This will include information on international treaties and domestic regulations governing the legality of production, transport and use of these agents in both the military and commerce. Issues concerning dual use or subversion of legitimate commercial activities will be examined. Information on the issues and means for detection, treaty verification, counter proliferation, deployment and examples of their use to date will also be presented. Administrative aspects of the national emergency response plans, legal authority of Federal, State and local governments and criminal investigation will be covered.

PAO550 PATHOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE
2 Quarter Hours

Through a series of lecture and multi-headed microscope sessions the student is provided with a broad overview of the essential issues in infectious disease pathology. The course starts with introductory sessions on disease pathogenesis and host response adaptations which is followed by a systemic approach to infectious disease pathology. Each major organ system is reviewed starting with histology of the organ system followed by emphasis on morphology of infectious diseases in that organ and laboratory diagnosis.

PA0601 SEMINARS IN PATHOLOGY
1 Quarter Hours

Provide and in depth understanding of experimental approaches to Pathology. Lectures on molecular pathobiology and comparative pathology by staff members and invited speakers will be offered weekly throughout the fall, winter and s, Note: This course can be taken for credit repeatedly, as the topics are continually changing.

PA0701 TUTORIAL IN MOLECULAR PATHOBIOLOGY
1-4 Quarter Hours

Students who wish to undertake supervised study in specific areas of Molecular Pathobiology may register for this course with the approval of the instructor (a member of the Pathology Department Faculty) and the student’s advisor. The instructor, advisor, and student will establish goals for the tutorial prior to the beginning of the course. The tutorial may be conferences, literature study, student presentations, laboratory exercises or any combination of these factors.

PA0801 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PATHOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

This course is designed to supplement and be taught concurrently with Pathology. The format will be a mixture of lectures and student presentations of the literature in Pathology. Selected topics in Pathology will be discussed to illustrate key experiments leading to our current knowledge of Pathology. Emphasis of the course will be placed on both theoretical and practical aspects of current research in Pathology. This course will be required for all graduate students in the Molecular Pathobiology graduate Program.

PA0901 RESEARCH IN MOLECULAR PATHOBIOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

Research projects by graduate students in molecular pathology will be conducted under the direct supervision of members of the faculty who will provide guidance and evaluate student performance in experimental design, conduct of experiments, analysis of data, and preparation of progress reports, verbal presentations, written dissertations and publications.

PA0902 RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

Research projects by graduate students in Comparative Pathology will be conducted under the direct supervision of members of the faculty who will provide guidance and evaluate student performance in experimental design, conduct of experiments, analysis of data, and preparation of progress reports, verbal presentations, written dissertations and publications.


PHARMACOLOGY

PHO513 GRADUATE PHARMACOLOGY
4 Quarter Hours

The Graduate Pharmacology course introduces students to fundamental principles of pharmacology, and surveys major groups of current therapeutic agents targeting the central and peripheral nervous systems, as well as the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, endocrine and immune systems. The course concludes with pharmacological applications for cancer chemotherapy and treatment of infectious diseases. The application of major prototypic drugs for relevant disease states will be discussed, but the major emphasis is on cellular, molecular and physiological mechanisms of action. Both lectures and student-led presentations of salient studies of primary literature are utilized. State-of-the-art and emerging concepts in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine, bioinformatics, drug development and delivery, drug abuse, and expanded us of biologics will be covered. Discussion of current societal trends and healthcare challenges will be incorporated. The course is designed to accommodate students with diverse backgrounds and interests.

PHO801 Special Topics in Pharmacology
1-4 Credit Hours

Students who wish to undertake supervised study in specific areas of pharmacology may register for this course with the approval of the course instructor (who will be a member of the Pharmacology Faculty) and the Chair of the Pharmacology Department. Students will undertake a study of readings in the selected topic and meet with the course instructor at least once a week for a tutorial to review the material. Other special opportunities for training in the selected area of pharmacology or attendance at lectures by speakers outside the Pharmacology Department may be incorporated into the course under the supervision of the course instructor. Examination will be by graded essay.


PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND BIOMETRICS

PMO502 INTRODUCTION TO SAS
1 Quarter Hour

This course provides an introduction to the use and interpretation of SAS data analysis software. Prerequisites: PMO503, PMO505

PMO503 BIOSTATISTICS I
3 Quarter Hours

This course instructs students in the application of elementary statistical procedures commonly used in biomedical and public health research. Topics include techniques of exploratory data analysis, probability, discrete and continuous statistical distributions, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and sample size determination for experiments and observational studies. Prerequisites: None

PMO504 BIOSTATISTICS II
4 Quarter Hours

This continuation of PMO503 covers many of the advanced statistical procedures commonly used in biomedical and public health research. Statistical methods include techniques for the analysis of contingency tables or frequency data, non-parametric methods, simple linear regression and correlation, principle of experimental design, analysis of variance, multiple regression, logistic regression, and analysis of survival data. Prerequisites: PMO503

PMO505 MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS
1 Quarter Hour

This course is an introduction to microcomputer software used for E-mail, file transfer, accessing the internet, managing references, and data analysis. Prerequisites: None

PMO508 BIOSTATISTICS III
3 Quarter Hours

This course is designed primarily for the doctoral student. This course teaches advanced statistical concepts and models for the analysis of quantitative and qualitative biomedical data. The course begins with basic general linear model concepts followed by a series of statistical models used in biomedical data analysis including multivariate techniques, matrix algebra, and statistical theory. Students will work on real data and analytical problems using a statistical software package (like SAS.) Prerequisites: PMO502-504

PMO511 INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY I
4 Quarter Hours

This course introduces the student to basic epidemiologic principles. The course initially focuses on the measurement of disease rates in populations, then transitions into a course of instruction on the basic epidemiologic study designs. Instruction is provided through lectures and in-class laboratory exercises. Prerequisites: College Algebra; PMO503 (concurrent)

PMO512 INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY II
4 Quarter Hours

This course expands upon the introduction to epidemiologic study design presented in PMO511. Methodologic issues such as sampling, measurement error, bias and confounding, and data analysis are introduced and illustrated with research examples from each of the major epidemiologic disciplines (e.g., occupational, infectious disease.) Students' knowledge of the principles of study design, conduct, and analysis are solidified through a written proposal project. Prerequisites: PMO503, 511, and 504 (concurrent)

PMO513 ADVANCED EPIDEMIOLOGIC METHODS
4 Quarter Hours

This course expands upon the concepts and content of PMO511 and 512. Particular emphasis is placed on data analysis. Laboratory exercises and simulations provide the students with hands-on experience in solving selected epidemiologic problems. The course provides advanced material on epidemiologic data analysis, as well as reviewing rates and measures, bias, confounding, and specific methodologic problems in epidemiology. Prerequisites: College algebra, PMO503, 504, 511, 512 and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO514 EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE
2 Quarter Hours

The natural history, distribution patterns, and risk factors of selected infectious diseases are discussed. Strategies for prevention or control are derived from such epidemiologic concepts as natural reservoir, modes of transmission, inapparent versus apparent infections, herd immunity, and the effects of immunization. Student participation in seminars and student presentations will constitute a major part of the course. Prerequisites: PMO511, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO515 EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF NON-INFECTIOUS DISEASES
2 Quarter Hours

The current strategies for the control of selected non-infectious conditions are presented in the context of their epidemiology (definition, distribution patterns, natural history and risk factors of etiologic or prognostic significance). Prerequisites: PMO511, 512, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO516 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES
3 Quarter Hours

This course is designed primarily for the doctoral student. The students will use the knowledge and abilities acquired in previous epidemiologic courses to conduct a cohort or a case-control study. This includes writing the study protocol, analyzing and interpreting the data, and writing a final report in the way of a journal article. The study will be based on existing databases and students will work under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: PMO513, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO519 OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

This course teaches the student the methods used in conducting epidemiologic studies of environmental and occupational exposures. A series of case studies will be used to demonstrate the methodological and analytical approaches used in studying disease risks associated with occupational and environmental exposure. Prerequisites: PMO511, 512, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO520 MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

This course reviews the application of techniques in molecular biology to the study of epidemiological problems. The range of techniques discussed includes variations of the polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid hybridization, mutation screening, solid phase immunoassays, flourescence activated cell scanning, and other immunoassay techniques. The application of these techniques is discussed in relation to the epidemiological study of transmission, pathogenesis, and etiology of infectious diseases, genetic predisposition to cancer and other diseases, gene discovery, and the genome project. A prerequisite for this course is the course, "Concepts in Molecular Biology and Immunology," unless the requirement is waived by the course director. It is the goal of these two related courses that each student will develop the capability to critically evaluate use of and apply molecular techniques in epidemiological studies. Prerequisites: PMO521, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO521 CONCEPTS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

This course is intended as an overview of current concepts in molecular and cell biology and immunology that will serve as a useful background for understanding the application of molecular techniques to the study of epidemiological problems. Conceptual areas reviewed include the nature, synthesis, and function of macromolecules, cellular structure, organization and function, techniques in molecular biology commonly used in epidemiology, important principles and techniques in immunology, and genetics. The concepts are presented at a level appropriate for allied health professionals, or as an update for individuals with doctoral degrees in human or animal health fields. The course is generally intended as a prerequisite for the course, "Molecular Epidemiology," although individuals who are already knowledgeable about the areas covered may have the requirement for this course waived by the course director. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO522 META-ANALYSIS
1 Quarter Hour

Using interactive, small group self-directed learning techniques, the course objectives are to (1) understand the strengths and weaknesses of meta-analysis and when the method is appropriate; (2) understand the steps of meta-analysis, including question definition, literature review, data abstraction, analysis and publication; and (3) understand the theory and statistical methods of meta-analysis including fixed and random effects models, tests of heterogeneity, publication bias, file drawer tests, and sensitivity analysis. Prerequisites: PMO503, 511 and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO523 FUNDAMENTALS OF U.S. HEALTHCARE POLICY
2 Quarter Hour

After successfully completing this course, participants will be able to: 1) understand how health is conceptualized by society and how a society’s attitudes about health and healthcare affect is policy decisions; 2) understand the impact of health policies on health services in terms of money, human resources and technology used to produce these services; 3) understand the consequences of health policy for individuals, health-related organizations and systems, and interest groups; 4) understand the sources of power and influence in policy decisions, including the pluralist and elitist views of the value of interest groups in the political marketplace; 5) describe the three phases of policymaking - formation, implementation, and modification; 6) understand methods of conducting policy analysis; 7) apply concepts learned in class to the different aspects of policy making - formulation, implementation and modification; and 8) demonstrate interpersonal and communications skills through oral and written presentations.

PMO524 HEALTH CARE PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT
2 Quarter Hours

This course addresses the framework for high performance represented by the Baldrige criteria and applies this framework to the improvement of healthcare processes. Students will use case studies and will apply concepts originally devised for the for-profit business sector to the healthcare market sector. Focus will be on determining the relative importance and impact of leadership, planning, data management, human resources and process management on organizational performance and profit.

PMO526 HEALTH SYSTEMS
4 Quarter Hours

This course provides an overview of the organization and function of health services in the U.S., including the pluralistic nature of the systems, the behavioral and economic foundations for understanding its function, current research relating to the health system, and current policy issues in regard to the organization of health services. Prerequisites: None

PMO527 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
3 Quarter Hours

This course provides a survey of health care management principles, including health planning, managed care organizational structures, resource management, quality improvement, decision making theory, organizational development, human resource theory, and managerial style and technique. Prerequisites: None

PMO528 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH I
2 Quarter Hours

This course introduces the structure and key issues of health and medical organizations in developed and developing countries with an emphasis on prioritization of International Health Projects, who funds these projects, and how decisions are made for such funding. Students will do a project determining a major health need and its potential solution in some region of the world. Several general issues underlying health will be discussed, including reproductive health, nutrition, and environment. We will also look at other concerns related especially to the military including bioterrorism and humanitarian assistance. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO529 HEALTH CARE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
2 Quarter Hours

This course provides the student with an overview of financial management in health care organizations and concepts influencing an organization's financial performance. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with health care resource and economic policy issues, and the interrelationship of business and clinical decision-making. The student will gain an understanding of how health care organizations are financed, to include sources of funding, budgeting and resource allocation, and will be able to describe the impact of capitation and managed care on financial performance. The student will also be able to interpret financial statements and business case analyses. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO530 THE SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES APPLIED TO PUBLIC HEALTH
4 Quarter Hours

This survey course exposes students to aspects of the behavioral and social sciences which are relevant to public health. It is intended to make students more sophisticated analysts of health problems by increasing their understanding of how complex the human aspects of prevention are. Major scientific theories and models of health behavior are presented early in the quarter. The remainder of the course focuses on important social factors and specific behaviors, with an emphasis on primary and secondary prevention. Prerequisites: None

PMO531 HEALTH PROMOTION
3 Quarter Hours

This course is designed for students already familiar with health behavior theory and want to learn how to plan and evaluate health promotion programs. While a program planning framework will be covered in lecture format, the development of practical skills will be emphasized throughout the quarter. Program implementation in different settings will be discussed, as will ethical issues relevant to health promotion. Prerequisites: PMO530, Permission of Course Director

PMO532 QUALITY ASSESSMENT AND IMPROVEMENT IN HEALTH CARE
2 Quarter Hours

This course provides students with a perspective on current quality of health care with attention to the measurement of quality and the methods for making improvements in critical areas. Subject matter will include national (Federal and non-governmental) and local programs for measurement and assessment; focus will be on how such information can be used to improve delivery and outcomes of health care. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO533 DECISION MAKING IN HEALTH SERVICES
4 Quarter Hours

This course is designed to acquaint students with quantitative and qualitative decision making tools needed for the assessment and continual improvement of health services activities. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO534 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

Medical anthropology has been a formal sub-discipline of anthropology for only the last several decades. It has generally been taught to anthropologists in order for them to better understand the culture being studied with an emphasis on the role of health promotion and disease treatment in the given cultural system. The goal of this course is to teach the understanding of culture and of medical anthropology (understanding medicine from the patient's point of view) to health professionals in order to increase understanding between the "healers" and the patients and from this would presumably flow better compliance and improved health outcomes. At the end of the course, students will be able to characterize barriers to health care produced by cultural differences, evaluate health-seeking behavior in a cross-cultural perspective, and characterize their own health care system perspectives as they relate to their own culture. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO535 THE LAW OF HEALTH CARE
3 Quarter Hours

This course provides an introduction to the law and the legal process in relation to health care administration, and is designed to provide the student an ability to deal with legal concepts in health care settings. Topics include constraints that the law and regulations impose on the health care industry, liability of health care providers, rights of patients, consent issues, and administrative law for health care organizations. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO536 CURRENT ISSUES IN COMMUNITY HEALTH
2 Quarter Hours

This course will expose the students to a variety of current topics related to community health. It will provide practical, real world examples of public health practice at the community level and will emphasize the important roles played by various health professionals in this setting. By the end of the course, students will have an appreciation of the complexities of community health issues and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to community health problem solving.

PMO537 CLINICAL DECISION MAKING
1 Quarter Hour

This is an introductory course in the principles of medical decision making. The first part of the course deals with heuristics used by health care providers, probability assessment, and the performance characteristics of diagnostic tests. The second part of the course provides an overview of instruments used in health policy and the decision sciences, including decision trees, patient preference assessment, and cost-effectiveness analysis. For each session there are specially prepared handouts, problems, and in-class exercises based upon the Stanford medical decision making series. The seminar is interactive to encourage understanding, application, and teaching of the concepts. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO538 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES OF INTERNATIONAL HEALTH
1 Quarter Hour

The course will focus on the evolution of international health practices in different civilizations from antiquity to modern times, addressing social, political and economic issues. The course will highlight the emergence of the Western Medicine thinking and the clash with the Eastern Medical practices and subsequent outcomes. In addition, it will predict future trends from a historical perspective. By the conclusion of the course, students will understand the problems of public health provisions in different cultures and throughout ages, their interdependencies and evolution, including impact on modern practices and policies. Students will be able to extract the lesson-learned which can be applicable to decision making process in international health care planing and delivery, and will have developed a familiarity with the multicultural aspect of public health research and practice. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO539 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH II
2 Quarter Hours

This course builds on the information from Global Health I. This course will target several specific diseases including several infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, and their impact on global health. The course will look at specific diseases which have been eradicated, nearly eradicated, or are being targeted directly, including a look to the future when chronic diseases will take center stage in the unfolding drama. Immunizations and the mechanisms for their delivery as well as other general preventive medical programs will be discussed. This course will also include discussions of health care systems around the world, using specific countries (China, Bolivia, Congo, Israel) as examples. Prerequisites: PMO528 and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO540 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
3 Quarter Hours

This course provides a broad exposure to basic environmental health subjects, including toxicology, epidemiology, indoor and outdoor air quality, food service sanitation, insects and rodents, environmental noise, energy, drinking water treatment, wastewater treatment, solid waste disposal, injury control, the workplace, risk assessment, risk communication, and environmental regulations. Discussions will cover the specific, general and global issues associated with these environmental health topics. Several site visits are scheduled during the course which will reinforce understanding of selected topics. Prerequisites: None

PMO541 ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
3 Quarter Hours

This course builds on material covered in PMO540, and provides a more indepth examination of the following selected topics: industrial hygiene, ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation, groundwater and soil, potable water and wastewater treatment, ambient and indoor air quality, health risk assessments, risk communications, and solid hazardous and medical wastes. It is specifically intended for students enrolled in the MPH degree who wish to pursue an environmental health track. Prerequisites: PMO540 or Concurrence of Course Director

PMO542 CLINICAL OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE
4 Quarter Hours

The course constitutes a review of the health risks associated with chemical, physical, and biological exposures in the workplace. It provides an introduction to the complex work environment in which the occupational health specialist must function. Lecture presentations, assignments, and practical exercises will address methods to detect and prevent occupational illness and injury within the context of an occupational medicine service. Discussion will include the clinical presentation, evaluation, and clinical course of common occupational diseases; the effects of occupational exposures on specific organ systems; and the hazards associated with specific industrial processes. Students will gain experience in history-taking, physical-examination techniques, and laboratory resources pertinent to the clinical practice of occupational and environmental medicine. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO543 INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
1 Quarter Hour

This course provides an overview of general principles and current issues in the field of occupational health. Focus will be on the introduction of concepts relevant to the task of protecting the health of workers. Lecturers will review general elements of recognition, treatment, control, and prevention of occupational diseases and injuries. This course is primarily intended to be an orientation of occupational and environmental medicine and preventive medicine residents. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO546 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL/OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
1 Quarter Hour

This course will be organized as a series of faculty, student and guest presentations on various topics in environmental and occupational health. Examples of topics covered are occupational lung diseases, occupational neurology, occupational reproductive hazards, safety, ergonomics and environmental risk assessment and communication. Instruction will be primarily didactic with discussions of assigned readings and lecture material following each presentation. Selection of specific topics and credit hours will depend on the needs and interests of the students and topics chosen. Specific learning objectives will be developed for each reiteration of the course. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO548 JOINT MEDICAL OPERATIONS AND HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE
3 Quarter Hours

Lectures will present the student with a historical perspective on the importance of preventive medicine in controlling disease and non-battle illnesses during deployments. Using the current National Security and National Military Strategies as a starting point, an examination of those strategies in relationship to joint military deployments and the role of military medicine in international humanitarian relief will be made. The medical threat estimate and assessment processes will be studied, and a working knowledge of preventive medicine activities necessary before, during and after a deployment will be reviewed and applied to selected case studies. Current service staffing, organizations, doctrine and capabilities for medically supporting a deployed joint force will be examined in depth. Students will conduct a mock deployment planning and assessment exercise in class, as well as present (in groups) their independent assessment of an historical or recent joint military or humanitarian assistance deployment operation. Prerequisites: Pre-fall session for Fall, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO549 ESSENTIALS OF TOXICOLOGY
4 Quarter Hours

This course will provide an introduction to the field of toxicology as it impacts individual health, population health, and the environment. Basic toxicology concepts including absorption, biotransformation, excretion, mechanisms of toxicity, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and teratogenesis will be covered. Organ system toxicity and the toxic effects of selected substances will be discussed. Students will be introduced to the methods and limitations of toxicity testing and risk assessment, and will become familiar with toxicology information sources. At the conclusion of the course they are expected to be able to evaluate the validity and reliability of toxicity information they are exposed to in the lay press, the scientific literature, and by regulatory agencies. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO550 INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE I AND LABORATORY
4 Quarter Hours

This course will cover the essentials of the practice of industrial hygiene through the concepts of hazard anticipation, recognition, evaluation and control. It is designed as an overview for those students with limited prior experience in industrial hygiene. Topics covered include threshold limit values and OSHA exposure limits, calculations of exposure data, classification of agents, monitoring techniques for particulates and gases/vapors, introduction to ventilation principles, noise, respiratory protection practices and physical hazards. The laboratory will familiarize students with commonly used industrial hygiene sampling equipment. Laboratories will emphasize calibration of sampling pumps, direct reading gas/vapor sampling equipment, sampling particulates, industrial ventilation, and industrial noise. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO552 INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE II AND LABORATORY
4 Quarter Hours

This Industrial Hygiene (IH) class is centered on the unique hazards in a military occupation. Military personnel have unique health hazards that cover traditional industrial hazards as well as a more vulnerable potential to confront nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) hazards while under attack or upon inadvertent exposure from terrorist activity. These threats can occur in any environment; indoors or outdoors; in the US or abroad and in many uncontrollable situations. An enormous responsibility is placed on environmental and occupational hygiene personnel to identify and quantify threats in many situations and conditions. This class will concentrate predominantly on the NBC threat, methods of detecting NBC in various situations, protection from NBC and decontamination of NBC agents. Particular attention will focus on field detection characteristics such as limit of detection, false readings, usability, etc. Familiarization with instruments will also be emphasized in this class.

PMO553 INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE FIELD STUDIES
1 Quarter Hour

This course is designed to familiarize the student with functional industrial hygiene operations. This will be accomplished by a series of lectures that support field trips to military and civilian work sites. Industrial facilities will be toured and industrial hygiene operations reviewed on site. The practice of industrial hygiene in the workplace will be demonstrated. Prerequisites: PMO550/ Concurrence of the Course Director

PMO554 HEALTH EFFECTS OF IONIZING AND NON-IONIZING RADIATION
3 Quarter Hours

Traditional ionizing radiation topics will be covered including, but not limited to basic battlefield effects, terrorist threats, and medical imaging. The background for current medical imaging techniques along with their limitations and precautions for use in military settings will be examined. Radio Frequency, microwave, and laser shipboard, battlefield and airfield medical effects will be discussed. A significant portion of the course will cover the latest lasers used on the modern battlefield, as well as medical procedures involving state of the art laser imaging, diagnosis and treatment. The course is designed as a survey to give the student a well rounded background of ionizing and non-ionizing issues concerning the health care professional. The course assumes no prior background on the part of the student. It is set up so that students with a limited background in physics and mathematics can gain a conceptual understanding of the subject. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO555 INDUSTRIAL VENTILATION
2 Quarter Hours

This course is intended to give in-depth and specialized instruction in the areas of industrial ventilation systems and local exhaust hoods. The engineering design of industrial ventilation systems will be evaluated to include contaminate generation, principles of air flow, ventilation of specific contaminants, design of local exhaust hoods, layout and sizing of ducts, balancing ventilation systems, and selection of fans, collectors, and testing instruments. Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to evaluate the effectiveness of any industrial or laboratory ventilation system. Prerequisites: PMO550 & PMO552 and Concurrence of the Course Director

PMO557 INTRODUCTION TO MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
1 Quarter Hour

This course is designed for occupational medicine residents of all military services. This course will complement PMO543 Fundamentals of Occupational Health, which will be taught in the same quarter. The course will follow the syllabus for Army Medical Department Center and School (AMEDD C&S) Course 6H-F20. The course will involve pre-class review of 6H-F20 web-based topics with class time centered on discussion of the web materials. Areas of discussion will include: 1) application of occupational health topics to military health care systems using current Army programs as a model; and 2) the advantages/disadvantages of this format of learning for residential and distance learning for students.

PMO558 FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL OCCUPATIONAL, ENVIRONMENTAL AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
1 Quarter Hour

This course is an introduction to the national Capital Consortium Residencies in Occupational and Environmental Medicine (OEM) and General Preventive Medicine (GPM) for academic-year OEM and GPM residents. It provides an introduction, through lectures and group class activities, to concepts and administrative procedures germane to the residency program. Resident competencies will be discussed, and each resident will prepare and present an individual educational plan. The class is also relevant and open to residents who are in the academic year of other service-related GPM or Aerospace Medicine Residency or fellowship programs.

PMO559 DECISION SUPPORT IN HEALTH CARE PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT
4 Quarter Hours

This course is a culminating experience in the health Services Track. The course material integrates concepts of leadership and decision making with the imperative for measuring and improving the performance of the system. The course will build upon information and knowledge obtained in prior Track courses and will prepare students to be leaders and managers of health systems of any size. Instructors will present the recent history of health care performance measurement and improvement in American health care including major thrusts such as total quality, evidenced-based medicine and external accreditation. In conjunction with experts in the field, students will study a variety of decision-making methods and tools to lead organizations; hands-on active experience with many of the tools will be included. The course will present the theoretical framework for each of these approaches and methods, the successes and the shortcomings of each and a general framework for accountability in health care.

PMO560 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF TROPICAL MEDICINE
6 Quarter Hours

This course presents a comprehensive approach to the principles and practice of tropical medicine. Tropical illness will be presented from the perspective of both the specific pathogen or disease and the major symptom complex (e.g., dermatologic, gastrointestinal, and pulmonary diseases). The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, complications, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of each disease will be presented. Rational approaches to patients with various symptom complexes are discussed.

PMO561 MEDICAL PARASITOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

This course consists of lectures, practical exercises, and demonstrations covering the important helminthic and protozoan diseases of man. The life cycle, epidemiology, geographic distribution, pathology and immunology together with laboratory and field methods of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are covered. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO562 SELECTED DISEASES OF THE TROPICS
4 Quarter Hours

This course will be made up of self-contained finite blocks covering specific disease subtitles such as malaria, schistosomiasis, trypanosomiasis, arboviral diseases, etc. Instruction will be didactic and cover the epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, pathology and medical management of the diseases. The selection of diseases to be covered will depend on the needs and interests of the student(s). Prerequisites: PMO560 or Concurrence of Course Director

PMO563 CLINICAL TROPICAL MEDICINE
1-12 Quarter Hours

This course consists of advanced and applied training in the diagnosis and management of diseases of the tropics that present special problems. The course is clinically oriented and exposes the student to patients at selected health care facilities in Asia, Africa, Central and South America. Emphasis is placed on the infectious diseases but noninfectious tropical diseases are also reviewed, emphasizing recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO564 EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF ARBOVIRUSES
2 (Lec), 4 (Lab) Quarter Hours

Spring (Lec) Summer (Lab) This course covers the epidemiology, prevention and control of viruses that are biologically transmitted by arthropods such as mosquitoes and ticks. In addition, some of the important South American hemorrhagic fever viruses and the hantaviruses are covered. At the end of the course, students should have an extensive understanding of how these viruses may cause outbreaks of human disease in urban and/or rural environments, how to assess risk of exposure to these viruses, and how to prevent and/or treat these viral diseases. Lectures and discussions will cover topics such as arthropod infection and transmission of viruses, the epidemiology of various viruses carried by arthropods and rodents, clinical course and pathology of certain viral diseases, risk assessment of arthropod-borne virus transmission, prevention/control of arthropod-borne virus transmission, and development of new antiviral drugs. Students taking the laboratory will receive extensive training in the latest techniques for isolating, diagnosing, and cultivating certain viruses. All students will have a wide variety of current scientific articles to read and discuss. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO565 VECTOR BIOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

This course presents an overview of vector biology as it relates to the epidemiological patterns of arthropod-borne diseases in human populations. Vector species of major arthropod-borne diseases will be selected to illustrate different types of disease transmission and to examine vector potential as influenced by climate and habitat, susceptibility to infection, vector longevity, length of extrinsic incubation, host preferences and the relationships between vector behavior, socio-cultural characteristics of human populations and disease incidence. The influence of vector biology on the methods and success of control efforts will be emphasized. The course will be presented in a series of lectures, discussions and class projects. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO566 PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF VECTOR COMPETENCE
4 Quarter Hours

This course presents essential aspects of arthropod physiology and basic physiological principles that regulate competence for transmission of disease agents. Lectures and discussions will cover subjects such as growth and metamorphosis of vectors, movement of the various life stages of vectors, sensory functions of vectors which aid in host location and feeding, digestion of blood in mosquitoes, and adaptation of different vectors to climatic stresses. Laboratories will demonstrate various physiological phenomena such as effects of hormones on growth and development of mosquitoes, ovarian development in mosquitoes, feeding stimuli for flies, effects of repellents on mosquito feeding, and effects of insecticides on mosquito locomotion. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO567 CHANGING PATTERNS OF ARTHROPOD-BORNE DISEASES
4 Quarter Hours

This course provides students with an overview of the current status of arthropod-borne diseases in the world today. Lectures and discussions will cover the biology and ecology of major groups of arthropod vectors, epidemiology of vector-borne diseases, arthropod-borne disease surveillance techniques and control measures. Laboratory sessions will acquaint students with the basic techniques used in medical entomology, including field collection methods, specimen preparation, preservation and storage, use of taxonomic resources for specimen identification and implementation of simple surveillance and control measures to reduce disease transmission. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO568 MEDICAL ACAROLOGY
4 Quarter Hours

This is a survey course designed to familiarize students with the major groupings of medically important mites, ticks, spiders and scorpions. Lectures will be presented on morphology, classification, behavior, ecology and control of the major groups of acarines, spiders and scorpions. Emphasis will be placed on those families of greatest medical importance. Procedures for collecting, preserving, clearing, mounting and identifying specimens will be covered in the laboratory sessions. Students will be required to complete a class project. Prerequisites: PMO567, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO569 MALARIA EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL
3 Quarter Hours

This course covers the epidemiology, prevention and control of malaria parasites that are biologically transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes. At the end of the course, students should have an extensive understanding of how malaria parasites may cause outbreaks of human disease in urban and/or rural environments, how to assess risk of exposure to these parasites, and how to prevent and/or treat malaria. Lectures and discussions will cover such topics as the history of malaria, the biology of the anopheline vectors and of the malaria parasite, the clinical course and pathology of malaria, current chemotherapy and chemoprophylactic regimens for malaria, immunological aspects of malaria and the prospect of vaccines against malaria, the epidemiology of malaria, and the strategies for the prevention and control of malaria. In the laboratory, the student will learn how to identify malaria parasites and vectors, to diagnose human malaria using various techniques, to grow the malaria parasites and vectors in the laboratory, to conduct malaria surveys, and to control the anopheline vectors. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO570 MODERN TECHNOLOGY AND VECTOR-BORNE DISEASE
4 Quarter Hours

This course provides an in-depth look at vector-host-parasite-reservoir relationships and the modern techniques utilized to study the causes of outbreaks of arthropod-borne human diseases. The lectures and discussions will focus on the factors that lead to the successful transmission of human pathogens by particular arthropod species under various ecological conditions. Laboratories will focus on utilizing the latest research techniques to examine various aspects of vector biology and disease transmission ecology. Students will have the opportunity to read and discuss a wide variety of current, cutting-edge scientific articles. Prerequisites: Graduate-level medical entomology course and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO571 BIOSYSTEMATICS IN MEDICAL ZOOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

This course will be presented in the form of lectures, discussion, demonstrations, and individual projects. The first half of the course will consist of lectures on the history and importance of systematics, the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, the concept of species, sources of variation, population genetics and mimicry. The second half of the course will examine the major systems of biological classification and how behavioral, physiological, biochemical, and molecular techniques are applied in classifying medically important taxa. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO572 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL MALACOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

This course is intended for students interested in the transmission of pathogens by invertebrates. It is designed to introduce students to those groups of mollusks which: (1) serve as passive agents for the dispersal of pathogens, including toxins; (2) actively inject neurotoxins into humans, and (3) serve as intermediate or paratenic hosts of helminthic parasites infecting humans and domestic animals. This course will cover those aspects of molluscan ecology, taxonomy, morphology, and physiology requisite to an understanding of the factors involved in the transmission of molluscan-borne diseases and the control of those mollusks. In addition, students will be introduced to techniques required for identification, collection, examination, maintenance and control of molluscan hosts. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO573 EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PREVENTION OF VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES
1 Quarter Hour

This is a distance-leaning/self-study course on vaccine-preventable diseases and immunization practice. It covers recommendations and practices in the U.S. setting, not for overseas travelers or residents of developing countries. Via web-on-demand, the student views four sessions, each lasting 3 ½ hours, of relays of the live, interactive satellite broadcast of this CDC distance-learning course.

PMO574 REMOTE SENSING AND GIS METHODS IN PUBLIC HEALTH
4 Quarter Hours

This course covers remote sensing, image processing, geographic information systems (GIS), and spatial analysis methods as applied to the field of public health. The goal of the course is to give students a combination of theoretical background, example applications in the literature and hands-on experience in using hardware and software that will enable students to use the techniques discussed class in a knowledgeable way in their research and future work in public health. The lectures will cover types of remote sensing imagery, image processing, photo interpretation of various imagery types, application of remote sensing to public health, overview and history of GIS, GIS data structures, entering data into a GIS, geographical analysis, cartographic presentation, and applications of GIS to public health. The laboratory will give students hands-on experience in public health uses of image processing and GIS software. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO575 BIOLOGICAL WARFARE AND TERRORISM: THE MILITARY AND PUBLIC HEALTH RESPONSE
1 Quarter Hour

Knowledge about the extensive biological weapons programs in other countries and numerous recent bioterrorism threats has increased the concern regarding the medical management of biological agent casualties on the battlefield or domestically. Objectives include 1) identify the most likely biological pathogens used in warfare or a terrorist event; 2) identify the characteristics which make a biological pathogen an effective weapon; 3) describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and medical management of representative pathogens and toxins; 4) identify the sequential steps involved in a successful medical response to a military biological weapons attack; 5) identify the epidemiological tools needed to recognize and distinguish a natural disease outbreak from a biological attack; 6) describe correct triage and field management methods for biological agent casualties; 7) differentiate between a public health response to BT event and other outbreak investigations; 8) identify the primary care providers and other public health professionals’ roles in a BT event; and 9) identify components of a Public Health response to bioterrorism.

PMO576 HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVES
2 Quarter Hours

This course provides an overview of the myriad of human resource programs and challenges facing the healthcare executives in the 21st century. Learning objectives will be approached from the middle management perspective. Six essential disciplines within human resources will be covered: employment law, training, compensation and benefits, employee relations/labor relations, and health, safety, and security.

PMO577 INTRODUCTION TO GIS IN PUBLIC HEALTH
2 Quarter Hours

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have become an important tool in public health research, planning and implementation of programs. Example applications include simple mapping of disease, determining the geographic proximity of a disease to environmental factors, and determining the best locations for patient services. The goal of the course is to give students an understanding of GIS and spatial analysis techniques, example applications, and hands-on experience in using hardware and software that will enable students to use the techniques discussed in class in a knowledgeable way in their research and future work in public health. The lectures will cover GIS data formats, entering data into a GIS, GPS, geographic analysis, cartographic presentation, and applications of GIS to public health. The laboratory will give students hands-on experience in using GIS software.

PMO578 REMOTE SENSING METHODS IN PUBLIC HEALTH
3 Quarter Hours

The use of images acquired from aircraft and satellites has an increasing role in public health research. Images can be used as a map layer in GIS projects to locate roads, buildings, etc. In environmental health studies and vector-borne disease studies, remotely sensed images are used to map some of the environmental factors (wetlands, water/air pollution, etc.) that control the distribution of these diseases. This course covers remote sensing theory and application as applied to the field of public health. The goal of the course is to give students a combination of theoretical background, example applications in the literature and hands-on experience in using hardware and software that will enable students to use the techniques discussed in class in a knowledgeable way in their research and future work in public health. The lectures will cover types of remote sensing imagery, image processing, photo interpretation of various imagery types, and application of remote sensing to public health. The laboratory will give students hands-on experience in photo interpretation and image processing of remotely sensed data.

PMO579 BIO (BIOLOGICAL INCIDENTS AND RESPONSE) ADVANCED COURSE
2 Quarter Hours
 
This advanced level course is intended for clinicians and scientists who desire to become conversant with and utilize advanced concepts in biodefense. It is intended for those desiring a state-of-the-art comprehensive understanding of the biological threat agents of greatest national concern, state-sponsored development and defense programs, and the complexities of medical, public health and social management of a biological crisis.

PMO581 RADIATION DOSIMETRY
2 Quarter Hours

Students will be able to do internal dose calculations based on the methods used in ICRP 30 and ICRP 60, and based on the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) method. Students will acquire a working knowledge of ICRP and NCRP reports relevant to the calculation of external and internal dosimetry calculations such as ICRP 51 "Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation", NCRP Report No. 65 "Management of Persons Accidentally Contaminated with Radionuclides", etc. Students will acquire a working knowledge of NUREG/ CR-4884 "Interpretation of Bioassay Measurements" relevant to the calculation of internal dose. Students will learn the fundamental principles, design, and operating characteristics behind passive and active personnel dosimetry systems such as Electronic Personal Dosimeters (EPDs), Optically Stimulated Luminescent (OSL) dosimeters, EEPROM type dosimeters, Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), Film Dosimetry, etc. Students will learn the fundamental principles, design, and operating characteristics of dosimetry area monitoring and environmental devices. Students will learn the fundamental principles of whole body, extremity, and environmental dosimetry. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO582 RADIATION BIOLOGY
2 Quarter Hours

The use of ionizing radiation in medical and industrial applications continues to expand. For example, approximately 320 million diagnostic medical and dental x-ray procedures are performed each year in the US. This fact highlights the need to study and quantify the stochastic (chronic) and non-stochastic (acute) effects of ionizing radiation. At the end of the course the student will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of ionizing radiation interactions with matter, human radiation exposure scenarios, fundamentals of radiation chemistry and cellular radiobiology, biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (chronic effects), radiation risks in perspective, biological effects of high doses of ionizing radiation (acute effects), and radiation accidents and biodosimetry. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO583 SUBSTANCE ABUSE
3 Quarter Hours

This course will review the breadth of knowledge known within the field of addiction medicine, with particular emphasis on the epidemiology, public health, health care delivery and effective interventions. Using a bio-psycho-social model, the varieties of drugs abused within the United States and overseas are reviewed. Specific attention is given to those drugs with have impact within the military. Methods of determining prevalence, incidence and impact of substance abuse are presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of the different methodologies, such as deterrence mandatory drug testing and self-report. Field trips to different types of treatment programs will allow interaction with providers and patients. Students are expected to actively participate in all class discussions. To add depth to the course, the student will focus on a specific area of interest, write a paper, and lead a class discussion on the topic. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO584 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH PHYSICS
3 Quarter Hours

Upon the completion of the course, students will be able to: Describe the various modes of decay, determine the types of equilibrium achievable for chains of nuclides, describe the basic interaction mechanisms for all types of ionizing radiation, recognize naturally occurring and man made radionuclides, calculate equilibrium activities and specific activities, perform basic activation calculations, understand the difference between roentgen and rad, and determine external and internal dose based on simplified scenarios. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO585 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PHYSICS
3 Quarter Hours

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: Perform atmospheric modeling calculations using Pasquill Gifford equations for both continuous and puff sources and understand the model limitations; describe the accumulation of nuclides in a lake or pond and the doses associated with utilizing this water for drinking, fishing or swimming; determine doses from sewage effluents; understand MARSSIM and how to apply it; determine environmental sampling strategies; understand air, water, and soil sampling principals; calculate doses to personnel from various environmental pathways; and transportation of radioactive waste. Prerequisites: PMO584 & Concurrence of Course Director

PMO587 NUCLEAR REACTORS, CRITICALITY, AND SHIELDING
3 Quarter Hours

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain basic atomic and nuclear physics concepts. They will be able to explain the interactions of radiation with matter. Students will learn the fundamental principles, design, and operating characteristics of several types of nuclear reactors including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, liquid metal reactors, and research reactors. Students learn how to write a technical laboratory report and perform laboratory experiments in neutron activation and reactor criticality at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Radiation Institute (AFRRI). They will become familiar with and use available computer codes and programs used in radiation interactions, reactor modeling, and shielding design. Students will be able to do radiation and reactor shielding calculations. Students will be become familiar with nuclear reactor; safety, environmental, and regulatory issues. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO588 INSTRUMENTATION OF IONIZING RADIATION
3 Quarter Hours

By the end of this course students will be able to calculate all of the statistical descriptors associated with counting; and will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of radiation detectors including (1) Particle counting instruments, (2) Dose measuring devices, and (3) Neutron detectors. Students will also be able to determine calibration characteristics for a given detector and calculate theoretical response of detectors and understand their theoretical operation. Prerequisites: PMO584 & Concurrence of Course Director

PMO589 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL PHYSICS
3 Quarter Hours

This introductory course will cover three of the core disciplines of medical physics: Diagnostic and therapeutic radiological physics, and medical nuclear physics. At the end of the course the student will demonstrate an understanding of the diagnostic applications of x-rays, gamma rays from sealed sources, radio frequency radiation, magnetic fields and ultrasonic radiation; the therapeutic applications of x-rays, gamma rays, electron and charged particle beams, neutrons and radiations from sealed radionuclide sources; the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of radionuclides (except those used in sealed sources for therapeutic purposes); the equipment associated with their production, use, measurement and evaluation; and the quality of images resulting from their production and use. Prerequisites: PMO581 & Concurrence of Course Director

PMO590 INTRODUCTION TO THE U.S. HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY
2 Quarter Hours

Health Scientists must understand the organizations, medical staffs, employees, and communities in which they work. To be effective, they must understand the context of today’s health care industry’s structure and dynamics. This course is a resource that presents information that explains health systems governance. Organizations that provide health services such as ambulatory care facilities, physician practices, hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies, health systems and public health agencies are identified and defined. How money moves through the system, insurance, health plans, Medicare, Medicaid and HMO’s are presented on an introductory level. Health Care personnel types, training, and management of human resources in the health services setting are presented.

PMO591 MARKETING AND STRATEGIC ISSUES FOR HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS
2 Quarter Hours

This course provides an overview of health systems marketing and strategic planning while integrating key concepts and skills derived from other courses within the health services track. Select topics include measuring and understanding consumer behavior, market segmentation and strategic targeting, crafting business case analyses, forecasting demand for care, analysis of the competitive environment, governance, and leveraging your public relations assets. At the completion of this course, students will present - in small teams - a solution to the Regents Health Care System case study used throughout the health services track to a mock “board of directors” for approval.

PMO592 HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT
2 Quarter Hours

This course provides an introduction to technology assessment as a tool for public policy, evidence-based health administration, and clinical decision-making. There are two modules in this course. The first module introduces medical technology assessment and its role in health systems and evaluates the priorities and strategies of the major initiatives in healthcare technology assessment. This includes an appraisal of the role of governmental agencies like the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; industry entities such as the Blue Cross Blue Shield Technology Evaluation Center; and academic efforts such as the Cochrane Collaboration. The second module introduces the tools of economic evaluation of health services and interventions, to include cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit analyses; and provides guidance on the presentation and use of economic evaluation results.

PMO593 MANAGED CARE AND HEALTH INSURANCE
2 Quarter Hours

This course examines the various types of third party payer plans: Health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), fee-for-service plans and health savings accounts. Formation, organization, contractual arrangements, and medical management of managed care regarding costs, utilization, quality, and access are analyzed from the perspectives of managed care organizations, employers, providers, and public policy. The relationship between health insurance and health care costs is explored.

PMO594 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL INFORMATICS
3 Quarter Hours

The course provides future health care leaders a conceptual framework for understanding medical informatics and information technology as applied in the healthcare environment. The course will include in-depth discussion of what “being digital” really means, and its implication for improving quality and achieving efficiencies in health care delivery. The course will also highlight successes and failures in implementing information technology and the critical role that leaders play in each step of the developmental process from idea inception through systematic implementation. Special topics include: the electronic medical record, reducing medical errors through technology, intranet-supported resources for improving clinical quality. PDS’s and other bedside technologies, and information security.

PMO595 INTRODUCTION TO COMPLEX SAMPLE SURVEY ANALYSIS
2 Quarter Hours

This course is developed to enable the students to do basic statistical analysis based on the complex surveys with sample weights. Such population complex surveys have been conducted in the US for civilian and military personnel. Well-known surveys are: the third National health and Nutrition Examination Surveys funded by National center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and surveys of Health Related Behaviors among Military Personnel (HRB) funded by the DoD. Real data extracted from one of the HRB will be used to illustrate the concepts in complex surveys and related statistical analyses. Statistical software, SAS-callable SUDAAN using SAS will be taught. Prior knowledge of SAS is not required although preferred.

PMO598 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH ECONOMICS
2 Quarter Hours

This course applies economic concepts to: analyze health, the healthcare market and policies for healthcare. Two primary themes for this course are: public health care economics, and military health care economics. As they relate to the primary topics of the course, the primary objectives of the course are: 1) to understand the distinctive economic characteristics of health, the healthcare industry and the professionals responsible for delivering health services; 2) from the standpoint of economics, to analyze and evaluate, the American systems of healthcare financing and delivery; and 3) to discuss multiple current policy issues such as health care costs, uncompensated care, managed care and health insurance reform.

PMO599 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH RISK COMMUNICATION
2 Quarter Hours

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of risk communication theory and practice. The student is oriented to the fundamentals, principles, and processes that have proven effective in communicating health risk in a high concern / low trust environment. Students are guided through the process of responding to difficult questions from a hostile or suspicious audience, of identifying key stakeholders, and of working with the media. Students will, while working in a small group, develop and present a risk communication strategy for a provided scenario.

PMO600 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH
2 Quarter Hour

The objective of this class is to familiarize the student with the concepts and principles involved in human physiology. It is assumed that the student has no background or limited background in human physiology or biological sciences. The class will also benefit students who need a refresher in physiology. This class will provide a basic physiology foundation to prepare the student for Environmental Toxicology (PMO549). The major topic areas covered are cell physiology, genetics, cancer, general toxicology concepts, liver, kidney, nervous system, immune system, endocrine system and reproductive system.

PMO601 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT
3 Quarter Hours

This course will provide the tools for understanding the risk assessment process and effectively managing and communicating the results. Students will learn the US Environmental Protection Agency protocol for human and ecological risk assessment, and learn basic risk communication skills. Students will learn how to perform a risk assessment by completing a notional exercise based on a real life scenario. The course will be taught in cooperation with the Health Risk Assessment Program at the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD). The course is taught 8 hours/day for 3 days, then the students return to USUHS to complete a risk assessment project. Prerequisites: PMO540 and Concurrence of the Course Director

PMO602 SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTES
3 Quarter Hours

Students will learn about the collection, transfer, disposal by sanitary landfill, waste to energy, and resource conservation and recovery of solid wastes. In addition, classification of hazardous wastes, risks, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Hazardous and Solid Waste Act, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, hazardous waste management, treatment technologies, land disposal, groundwater contamination and rededication will also be presented. Lab time is devoted to problem solving exercises and site visits to waste material treatment, storage, handling and recycling operations. Prerequisites: PMO540 and Concurrence of the Course Director

PMO603 DEPLOYMENT ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES
5 Quarter Hours

Students will learn how environmental exposures are qualified, recorded, analyzed, and interpreted into usable information no only for ground commanders' immediate use, but subsequently for later use by DoD, the Veterans Administration, and others. Students will be offered the opportunity to go TDY/TAD with environmental experts during mission work relating to environmental exposure surveillance. Prerequisites: PMO540 and Concurrence of the Course Director

PMO604 FUNDAMENTALS OF HYDROLOGY AND WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN
5 Quarter Hours

Topics will cover hydrology (Spring - 1 credit), water treatment plant design (Fall - 2 credits), and wastewater treatment plant design and operation (Winter - 2 credits.) Site visits to local municipal water and wastewater treatment plants will enhance the student's understanding of the processes. Prerequisites: PMO540 and Concurrence of the Course Director

PMO605 ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTATION METHODOLOGIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
3 Quarter Hours

The second-year MSPH student will examine the major instrumental methodologies used in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of samples taken during environmental health risk assessment or environmental health surveillance procedures. Methods examined will be atomic absorption spectrophotometry, mass spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, ICP-MS, ion and liquid chromatography, ELISA, PCR, radiochemistry and techniques. For each methodology the student will learn the scientific basis, equipment set-up and procedures, limitations, interferences, calibration, QA/QC, application, and sample preparation. The student will also understand the regulatory source of these methodologies and their application to different classes of environmental media, and the requirements for laboratory accreditation and certification. The course is conducted through lectures, demonstrations and laboratory exercises. The course grade is based on two examinations and course participation. The laboratories will be conducted at the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, using a compressed time period. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO606 NON-IONIZING RADIATION
3 Quarter Hours

The electromagnetic spectrum, transmission and absorption, biological effects, units of exposure, protection standards, measurement and control of UV, IR, microwaves, and lasers for both military and industrial use will be examined in detail. Actual measurements will be performed in laboratories and at various local military bases. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO607 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY
4 Quarter Hour

This course will provide students with the knowledge and experience needed to predict, study, and describe the origin and distribution of xenobiotic chemical species, and their properties that effect uptake into biological systems. Prerequisites: PMO540 & PMO549, 1 year of organic & inorganic chemistry, and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO611 CLASSIC STUDIES IN EPIDEMIOLOGY
1-3 Quarter Hours

Students will analyze original articles in the medical literature that form the basis for current practices in epidemiology. Focus will be on the conceptual and methodologic advances in the field. Articles will be selected for discussion based on their quality, originality and, above all, on their influence on the field of epidemiology. Definitions of "classic" studies vary, but we will concentrate on those which changed the way epidemiologic studies are conducted and the way that epidemiologists think. Prerequisites: PMO511, and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO612 CLINICAL MEDICINE IN THE TROPICS
3-5 Quarter Hours

This course consists of advanced and applied training, at the bedside, in the diagnosis and management of diseases in the tropics. Emphasis is placed on the infectious diseases, but non-infectious tropical disease problems are also reviewed. There will be extensive use of clinical cases from wards at hospitals associated with the University's overseas research and training program in tropical infectious diseases. Training conducted at NAMRU-3. Prerequisites: PMO650, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO613 PUBLIC HEALTH OF DISASTERS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
4 Quarter Hours

This course focuses on the public health consequences of disasters in developing countries (natural, man-made and technological) and on the principal public health interventions needed to mitigate the disaster’s affects. Students will learn epidemiological tools to assess and monitor the health of populations affected by disasters. The response of the medical community when planning for and/or supporting complex humanitarian crises will be emphasized. The course will use guest speakers to support the course material.

PMO614 TROPICAL MEDICINE ROUNDS
2 Quarter Hours

This is a clinical case management course, geared toward the diagnosis and treatment of common tropical illnesses. Each session will start with a description of an illness in a patient. The etiology of the illness will not be known to the students. Discussion will include differential diagnosis, specific treatment, complications, epidemiological implications, and preventive measures that could have avoided disease.

PMO615 SAND FLIES AND DISEASES
3 Quarter Hours

This course presents a thorough coverage of the phlebotomine sand flies and their importance as vectors of diseases such as the leishmaniases, bartonellosis and sand fly fever. Particular emphasis is given to the leishmaniases and the ecology of Leishmania transmission, including parasite-vector and vector-host interactions, sand fly and Leishmania surveillance and leishmaniasis prevention and control. The course also touches briefly on the biting midges and the diseases they transmit such as blue tongue and Oropouche viruses, and certain microfilariae. Students will gain an extensive understanding of sand fly and biting midge biology and ecology, and will be able to recognize sand flies and biting midges and identify important vector species using dichotomous keys. They will learn to organize and conduct sand fly and Leishmaniasurveys to assess the risk of human exposure, and will be able to recommend appropriate countermeasures for vector and disease suppression. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO630 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH POLICY
3 Quarter Hours

Students will explore policy formulation, implementation, and evaluation for environmental health at DoD staff, DoD service (Army, Navy, Air Force), USPHS organizations, other Federal agencies, and national levels. The scope will include specific environmental health policy and current management concerns and issues. Lectures will cover risk assessment, risk management, environmental assessments, health hazard assessments, standard setting, restoring the environment, and more. Prerequisites: PMO540, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO631 MSPH JOURNAL CLUB: ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH CASE STUDIES
1 Quarter Hour

This course is intended for students in the two-year MSPH program. The session, a monthly one-hour noon time session, will consist of student led discussions of selected articles from the scientific literature pertaining to environmental and occupational health. The discussions will focus on scientific merit and policy issues that can be identified from the perspective of the DoD and other federal agencies.

PMO635 MILITARY RADIOLOGICAL OPERATIONS IN PEACETIME SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hour

The seminar will familiarize students with the multifaceted health physics aspects of the peacetime operations of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Experts in various levels and positions will present “mini-courses” of their area of expertise. New and established reference documents, texts, and modeling software will be reviewed. The course is designed to be a dynamic presentation of issues that graduates will be exposed to post-graduation. The course will cover a wide range of operational topics ranging form the duties and responsibilities of a medical health physicist to casualty estimations from nuclear weapons or radiological dispersal devices, from low level environmental measurements to issues of mass hysteria caused by potential releases of biological, chemical or radiological agents. Classified material may be discussed in some of the presentation.

PMO636 MILITARY RADIOLOGICAL OPERATIONS IN CONFLICT SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hour

This seminar will familiarize students with the multifaceted health physics aspects of the peacetime operations of the Army, Navy, and Air Force during conflict. Experts in various levels and positions will present “mini-courses” of their area of expertise. New and established reference documents, texts, and modeling software will be reviewed. The course is designed to be a dynamic presentation of issues that graduates will be exposed to post-graduation. The course will cover a wide range of operational topics ranging form the duties and responsibilities of a medical health physicist casualty estimations from nuclear weapons or radiological dispersal devices, from low level environmental measurements to issues of mass hysteria caused by potential releases of biological, chemical or radiological agents. Classified material may be discussed in some of the presentation.

PMO637 MILITARY/CIVILIAN RADIOLOGICAL OPERATIONS AND INTERACTIONS SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hour

This seminar will familiarize students with the multifaceted health physics aspects of the peacetime operations of the Army, Navy, and Air Force and how they interact with the variuos civilian emergency response agencies. Experts in various levels and positions will present “mini-courses” of their area of expertise. New and established reference documents, texts, and modeling software will be reviewed. The course is designed to be a dynamic presentation of issues that graduates will be exposed to post-graduation. The course will cover a wide range of operational topics ranging form the duties and responsibilities of a medical health physicist to casualty estimations from nuclear weapons or radiological dispersal devices, from low level environmental measurements to issues of mass hysteria caused by potential releases of biological, chemical or radiological agents. Classified material may be discussed in some of the presentation.

PMO640 ENVIRONMENTAL/OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SEMINAR
2 Quarter Hours

The seminar will be organized as a series of presentations by faculty, students and visiting lecturers. The seminar is intended to allow presentations on current topics in the fields of industrial hygiene, safety, environmental health and occupational medicine. Additionally, the fall and spring seminars will provide faculty, residents and students the opportunity to present research projects and findings. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO641 OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PROGRAM MANAGEMENT SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hour

The seminar is organized as a series of faculty and guest presentations that outline management techniques appropriate to large occupational health programs. Group discussions by seminar members will follow the presentations. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO651 HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING
3 Quarter Hours

A practical introduction to the application of human physical, perceptive and cognitive abilities and behaviors, human performance engineering design criteria, and human factors principles and practices to the design of systems, subsystems, equipment and facilities. Topics include basic human factors research and design methods, perception, cognition, information reception and processing, decision theory, memory, judgement, performance capabilities and limitations in human-machine systems. Prerequisite: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO652 OCCUPATIONAL ERGONOMICS
3 Quarter Hours

Introductory course in ergonomics covering human physical capabilities and capacities applied to the analysis and design of the workplace, tasks, tools and equipment. Topics include biomechanics, work physiology, psychophysics, workstations, tools, work procedures, design guidelines and standards, noise, vibration and heat stress. Special emphasis is placed on the recognition and control of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Prerequisite: PMO651 and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO653 WORK ANALYSIS METHODS
3 Quarter Hours

Survey of ergonomic analysis techniques using traditional industrial engineering approaches such as time-motion study and work sampling in the analysis of task demands and human performance. Topics include performance measures, function allocation, general and specific task analysis techniques (OWAS, RULA, Strain Index, PATH, NIOSH Lift Equation, etc.), human reliability and economic analyses. Prerequisites: PMO561 and PMO562

PMO654 SAFETY ENGINEERING
3 Quarter Hours

Survey of safety concepts, legal concepts, qualitative and quantitative hazard evaluation, hazard classification, system life cycle safety applied to the design of tools, equipment and the environment to eliminate or control occupational safety hazards. Topics include system safety analyses, fault hazard analysis, failure mode and effects analysis, fault tree analysis, errors and risk assessment codes. Prerequisite: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO655 CURRENT INJURY PREVENTION ISSUES AND INITIATIVES SEMINAR
2 Quarter Hours

Examination of injury prevention policies, initiatives, plans and current knowledge with special emphasis on the examination of analytic and intervention research studies and risk communication methods. Topics include current Department of Defense policies and initiatives, the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS), epidemiologic studies, case studies and demonstration projects, behavioral issues and risk communication methods. Prerequisite: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO661 MEDICAL ZOOLOGY SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hours

This seminar series presents reviews of current concepts and research in Medical Parasitology and Medical Entomology. Guest speakers, faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and enrolled graduate students present weekly seminars on selected topics. As this seminar series is scheduled for two quarters, topics presented will vary each quarter. Students will present a review of their own research or currently published literature each quarter they are enrolled. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO670 PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICUM
1-3 Quarter Hours

Students will be given a variety of public health experiential training opportunities within military and civilian organizations in the local geographic area and possibly other more distant sites. Students will enhance their didactic learning experience by practical application, and they will acquire a broad public health perspective to specific health-related problems. Prerequisites: PMO503,511,526,530,540 and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO671 INTRODUCTION TO THE MPH PROJECT AND PRACTICUM
1 Quarter Hour

This seminar course is designed to introduce students to the year-long process of the conception, development, execution, and reporting of their independent projects and practicum experiences. It includes brief presentations by guest speakers from various military and civilian organizations offering potential projects and practicums. Goal setting, time lines, and curriculum planning for successful completion of the MPH program will be integrated into the course. Students will be able to describe the criteria for an appropriate independent project and practicum activity, and formulate a short list of possible projects or practicums aligned with their personal and professional goals. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO672 MPH PROJECT/PRACTICUM DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
1 Quarter Hour

Building on the introductory course in this series, students will receive guidance on developing a pre-proposal and final proposal for their independent project, including instructor feedback and peer review. Discussions will focus on the criteria and format for different types of projects (i.e., grant proposal, policy formulation, needs assessment, program evaluation, etc.), the process for institutional assurances and human subjects research review and approval, animal care and use issues, and the synthesis and integration of public health principles into project design. Students will be encouraged to explore the possibility of combining their independent project with a practicum activity. Students will be able to develop and critique MPH project proposals and describe the process of institutional assurances and approvals for research projects. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO673 MPH PROJECT/PRACTICUM IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION
1 Quarter Hour

In the third and last of this seminar series designed to guide students through the process of developing and completing their MPH independent projects and practicums, students will present and receive instructor feedback and peer review on project proposals, presentations, or reports, depending on individual progress. This course will be a forum for discussing and finding solutions to issues or problems related to study design, the IRB approval process, funding for travel or other budget items, barriers to study implementation, amendments to protocols, etc. Guest speakers may also reinforce the oral and written communication skills that are essential to public health practitioners. Students will be able to provide and receive peer review on project and practicum proposals, oral presentations, military briefings, project reports, policy papers, poster presentations, or audio-visual materials, as they are being drafted and revised, and demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills when reporting research findings to various audiences. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO674 MPH INDEPENDENT PROJECT
3 Quarter Hours

This course is required of all MPH students to receive credit for the final phase and end products of their independent project to fulfill the program requirement for a "culminating experience." The independent project may take one of several acceptable forms and be developed and implemented over more than one academic quarter. Students receive an appropriate number of credits (pass/fail) for preliminary and interim work on the project by enrolling in other "independent studies" or "directed reading/research" courses in the PMB Department under the tutelage of their respective project mentors. This course provides a mechanism for students to receive credit for work done to complete the project, prepare an oral presentation, and write a final report. Prerequisites: All Core Courses

PMO680 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH
1 Quarter Hour

This course provides foundational general knowledge of the scope and content of public health and its relation to the practice of medicine, health promotion and provision of health care services to populations. The intent of the course is to provide an overview and foundation for later coursework during the year. Focus is in on the organization, structure, goals and issues of public health in the United States, although these are discussed in contrast to and in the context of global public health concerns and approaches. In that regard, additional emphasis will be placed the history of public health, ethics of public health practice, and issues of socioeconomic, culture and other factors contributing to burden of disease and health disparities both within the US and internationally.

PMO681 CURRENT PROBLEMS AND PRACTICE OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH
1-3 Quarter Hours

This course is designed to provide students with exposure to real-world issues from a variety of public health settings. Guest speakers are drawn from a variety of public health agencies and work settings, from local to national, including both civilian and military. Speakers describe the structure and function of their organizations, as well as the typical public health concerns they address. The theme is to demonstrate practical applications of epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, behavioral science, and health services administration. Prerequisites: None

PMO682 HISTORY OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
2-4 Quarter Hours

The evolution and development of the medical and social aspects of public health and preventive medicine, and specialized disciplines (statistics, epidemiology) will be studied to explicate both the historical background of the present, and to extract the historical foundation for persistent concepts and functions. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO683 CRITICAL READING SEMINAR
2 Quarter Hours

The Critical Reading Seminar is part of the USUHS/WRAMC Fellowship Program in General Internal Medicine. It is designed to teach participants to read clinical literature critically, using epidemiologic and statistical techniques. The seminar in the is devoted to a study of the critical appraisal materials designed by the Department of Critical Epidemiology at McMaster University. Exercises are designed to provide a practical experience in employing McMaster's methodology to significant articles chosen to exemplify both excellent and problematic clinical investigation. Subsequently, participants choose their own critical reading packages. Each session is devoted to reading in depth about a single topic; all participants are provided with three to five articles to read critically prior to the seminar. During the seminar, participants rotate as facilitators; all participants discuss the chosen articles. The articles reviewed are primarily from the internal medicine literature and deal with major topics in preventive medicine, epidemiology, and utilization of diagnostic technology, causation, quality of care, economic analysis, prognosis, and therapy. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO684 CLINICAL RESEARCH SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hour

The Clinical Research Seminar is part of the WRAMC/USUHS Fellowship Program in General Preventive Medicine. The seminars concentrate on how to design clinical investigation projects, with a particular emphasis on areas in academic general medicine, such as ambulatory care, geriatrics, medical interviewing, preoperative evaluation, clinical decision making, medical education, behavioral medicine, and health services research. Speakers emphasize methodologic issues and, in particular, explore problems associated with clinical research. About 1/3 of the seminars will be conducted by WRAMC or USUHS investigators; 1/3 will focus on special topics in clinical research; and 1/3 will be led by speakers invited from outside agencies and institutions. The format is informal to allow a brisk dialogue between participants and speakers. Students will see how principles of clinical research and implemented in actual projects, and will learn how to identify methodologic problems when designing protocols and reading the literature. (2 Tues/mo) Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO685 HEALTH POLICY SEMINAR
1 Quarter Hour

The Health Policy Seminar is given as a part of the USUHS/WRAMC Fellowship Program in General Internal Medicine. Selected topics in both military and civilian medicine are addressed, such as biomedical ethics, legislative issues, health care utilization and manpower, and other health policy issues. Sessions will include invited speakers, selected readings with discussion, and occasionally a congressional field trip. Students will become more aware of how policy decisions impact upon the teaching and practice of medicine. (2 Thurs/mo) Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO688 INFORMATION GATHERING IN CLINICAL MEDICINE
2-12 Quarter Hours

Information gathered in the clinical setting becomes data used in epidemiological and health outcomes research. This course will provide opportunities for students to learn from research-oriented practicing clinicians in a clinical setting. Students will learn the problems involved in collecting accurate information from patients through history-taking, physical examination, laboratory testing, and questionnaire administration. Teaching methods will center on observation of the physician at work and, as much as possible, active participation of the students in collecting data, and will include assigned readings and tutorials. Prerequisites: PMO511 & PMO512, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO690 EDUCATIONAL METHODS
2 Quarter Hours

Examines theory and practice in the teaching and learning process. Introduces a wide spectrum of instructional methods for adult learners, curriculum development strategies, and evaluation methods. This course will prepare doctoral students to teach in their own topic area. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO691 TEACHING PRACTICUM
3 Quarter Hours

As one of the requirements of the Dr.P.H. program, students will act as Teaching Assistants for at least one course per year. In addition to providing assistance to the course director, they are expected to expand and deepen their knowledge of the material taught, sharpen their skills, and gain experience in giving lectures, leading seminars, supervising laboratory exercises, preparing and grading examinations, reviewing homework, and counseling students. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO692 CLINICAL CONCEPTS FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS - PART 1
2 Quarter Hours

This required course is designed for Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) candidates. The DrPH curriculum focuses on the interface between health care systems and the population served. This seminar course will concentrate on the provider-patient interface at the level of the individual. Students will be introduced to the mainstays of clinical practice: diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention for individual patients. An overview of the pathophysiologic basis of disease will be presented along with basic concepts of clinical decision making. The organ system approach will be used to cover major disease categories. Case studies or clinical vignettes will be incorporated throughout the course to introduce students to medical terminology and to illustrate important concepts of medical practice. Students will gain a sense of the "mystery and majesty of the human condition" and the complexities of the healing process as they relate to the art and science of medicine. Prerequisites: Doctoral Student Status/Concurrence of Course Director

PMO693 CLINICAL CONCEPTS FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS - PART 2
2 Quarter Hours

This required follow-up course will continue to explore the concepts introduced in Part 1 and how these concepts relate to the major public health problems addressed in the "Healthy People 2010" goals and objectives. Major conditions of public health importance will be used to illustrate how clinicians integrate knowledge from the basic sciences with clinical reasoning skills to diagnose, treat, and prevent these illnesses. The practice of evidence-based medicine in various clinical settings will be presented, as well as clinical decision analysis as an approach to managing the uncertainty in clinical practice. Case studies will again be incorporated throughout the course to reinforce concepts and to foster discussion on the integration of these clinical concepts into the population-based practice of public health. The overarching purpose of this two-part course is for doctoral students with diverse backgrounds to acquire an understanding of the clinical domain of medical practice in order to facilitate partnerships among health professionals who share the common goal of improving the public's health, whether individually or at the population level. Prerequisites: PMO692 and Concurrence of Course Director

PMO701 ADVANCED BIOMETRICS TUTORIAL
1-12 Quarter Hours

Selected advanced topics in biometrics, not covered in other graduate courses, that are of interest to the student(s). Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO760 TROPICAL MEDICINE RESEARCH TUTORIAL
1-12 Quarter Hours

Students, with faculty advice, will develop a study question for a directed research project during the overseas quarter. Background research of the medical/scientific literature will be required to formulate a hypothesis to be investigated. Laboratory procedures necessary for the study, but with which the student is unfamiliar, will be identified. This tutorial will include learning these techniques. There will be requirements for outside reading to understand the theory, as well as laboratory hands-on instruction to master the mechanics of the procedure(s) required to do the research project. Prerequisites: PMO560,Concurrence of Course Director

PMO761 IMMUNOPARASITOLOGY TUTORIAL
3 Quarter Hours

This course covers the immune responses in hosts caused by parasites and the mechanisms of escape selected by the parasites. The student will gain knowledge in the immune responses, including non-specific mechanisms such as activated macrophages, neutrophils and eosinophils, and the humoral and cellular arms of the specific immune response to various human parasites. In addition, antigenic variation demonstrated in a number of protozoan parasites will be analyzed with reference to malaria and trypanosomiasis. The mechanisms which permit intracellular survival of Leishmania and Toxoplasma will also be assessed. The potential for immunization against human parasites, utilizing the state-of-the-art molecular biology techniques is explored specifically with reference to malaria, trypanosomiasis, and schistosomiasis. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO763 TUTORIAL IN MEDICAL ZOOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

The faculty will prescribe a literature review to cover a broad background in medical parasitology and vector biology. The students will meet with the faculty member for discussion of the material. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO764 TUTORIAL IN AQUATIC BIOLOGY
4 Quarter Hours

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the major groupings of aquatic arthropods, with emphasis on those families which are vectors of disease, which prey on disease vectors; and which serve as useful indicators of environmental pollution. Lectures will be presented on morphology, classification, behavior and ecology of the major groups. Procedures for collecting, preserving, mounting and identifying the different groups of aquatic arthropods will be covered in the laboratory sessions. Students will be required to develop and turn in an extensive collection, complete with field notes, of preserved and identified specimens of genera represented in the locale of Washington, DC. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO811 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EPIDEMIOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

This course provides experience in epidemiologic investigations as well as programs of reading and research in specific areas of epidemiologic interest. Students work under the supervision of a faculty member. A proposal must be submitted to the faculty mentor for approval and credits are assigned commensurate with the complexity of the project. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Division Director

PMO830 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
1-12 Quarter Hours

Under the mentorship of a faculty member, students will conduct an independent study project in the social and behavioral sciences as they relate to public health. The objective is to acquire specific methodological skills or deepen their understanding of the field's science base. Prerequisites: Permission of Course Director

PMO841 AEROSPACE OPERATIONAL PHYSIOLOGY I
3 Quarter Hours

This course introduces students to aerospace physiology. It involves lectures, readings, and discussions that review the history and physiological issues related to exposure to high altitudes. Emphasis is placed on the physical nature of the atmosphere as well as respiratory/circulatory anatomy and physiological effects of exposure to decreased atmospheric pressure. Aircraft and flight equipment designs to counter the physiological threats are included. Prerequisites: Permission of Course Director

PMO842 AEROSPACE OPERATIONAL PHYSIOLOGY II
3 Quarter Hours

This course continues to introduce students to aerospace physiology. It involves lectures, readings, and discussions that review the physiological problems associated with flight. Emphasis is placed on the areas of sensory physiology, acceleration physiology & biodynamics, and crash preparation. The role of associated survival equipment will be emphasized in each are. By the end of the course the student will know how to calculate the forces involved in an aircraft mishap. Prerequisites: Permission of Course Dir & Trigonometry, PMO841 recommended Winter

PMO845 HUMAN FACTORS IN AVIATION
3 Quarter Hours

This course will introduce the student to the multifaceted concept of human factors in aviation. It will discuss the impact of human limitations and human interaction in the flight environment. Emphasis will be placed on identifying the role of human factors in aircraft mishaps. The course will also include preventive techniques used to reduce human error. Crew/Cockpit Resource Management Training teaches crews to use all resources available to them to increase mission effectiveness and flight safety. Secondly, Operational Risk Management attempts to identify hazards and alleviate or compensate for them. Lastly, technical advances enable more realistic simulator training to better prepare crews for high threat contingencies. At the completion of the course the student will be able to effectively evaluate aviation related CRM/ORM issues.

PMO846 AEROSPACE EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
3 Quarter Hours

This course will introduce the student to exercise physiology as it relates to the aviation environment. The course will be comprised of lecture, seminar, and laboratory/field trip experiences. Emphasis will be placed on the role of proper physical conditioning in maintaining the healthy lifestyle necessary for optimum performance in the demanding environment of flight and flight operations. At the end of the course the student will be able to design physical conditioning programs for aviators based upon the demands of the weapon system in which they fly. The student will also be able to apply exercise physiology principles to the aviation environment. Prerequisites: Permission of Course Director, PMO841 & PMO842 recommended

PMO847 AEROSPACE PERFORMANCE AND HEALTH
3 Quarter Hours

This course will introduce the student to health related topics as they apply to performance in the air and space environments. The curse will be comprised of lecture and seminar using aviation mishaps to illustrate the health/performance issues. The student will be required to research a given mishap, given the appropriate background information, and then provide a human factors analysis of the event. Topics will include such things as nutritional supplements, fatigue, fitness, body defenses, general health, dehydration, and medications. At the end of the course the student will have a broad understanding of the relationship of health to performance in the aerospace environment. Prerequisites: Permission of Course Director, PMO841 & PMO842 recommended.

PMO848 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AEROSPACE MEDICINE
2-3 Quarter Hours

This course will focus on current medical issues within the Aerospace Medicine arena. The topic theme will vary each year depending on student/faculty interests. Themes can include medicine in extreme environments, diving medicine, wilderness medicine, hyperbaric medicine to mention a few. Each theme will be dealt with in detail from both a physiologic and clinical viewpoint while keeping in mind the overarching principles of preventive medicine and public health. The credit hours for the course will reflect the volume of material within the given topic. Topics with greater volume of material will meet 3 hours per week, those with lesser volume 2 hours per week; course credits awarded will conform to the number of contact hours.

PMO849 AEROSPACE MEDICINE IN THE MODERN AGE
3 Quarter Hours

This course will focus on current medical issues affecting those individuals engaged in flying, whether aircrew or passengers. Physiologic, clinical, and operational aspects of each issue will be emphasized. The variety of medical topics covered will ensure inclusion of controversy and preventive medicine/public health impact. Eight focus areas will be addressed: Incapacitation, Performance Enhancement, Performance Degradation, Medical Standards, Protective Equipment, Environment, Ergonomics, and Aeromedical Transportation. Each will involve some degree of didactic presentation, interactive discussion lead by the students, literature review, and case studies.

PMO861 TOPICS IN MEDICAL ZOOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

Topics of current research interest in medical parasitology or vector biology will be selected. The student will carry out a literature review and prepare an oral or a written report for presentation. The presentation may include a laboratory demonstration. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO881 MILITARY PREVENTIVE MEDICINE STUDY TOPICS
1-12 Quarter Hours

The student, with the advice of the instructor, will select a topic of Military Preventive Medicine interest. It may be a current unresolved problem; an established procedure or traditional program; or a practice of the past. The topic may be approached as a program design, a program evaluation or as an historical review. The student will develop his information sources and in periodic tutorial sessions discuss with the instructor his data and the need and sources of more material. The final written report will be in military staff study format or as modified with the instructor's Concurrence. Prerequisites: Concurrence of the Instructor

PMO900 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL RESEARCH
2 Quarter Hours

This course is the first course in a new Clinical Research Concentration (MPH) that is currently underdevelopment at USU. This course will present students with the rationale for conducting clinical studies and introduce basic clinical trial methodology. Fundamentals of design, conduct, and analysis will be presented through modern and historical examples. Key ethical and regulatory issues related to clinical trials will be highlighted, as will the unique role of the military in past and present examples of clinical research. This course is intended to provide a basis for understanding clinical trial design and analysis.

PMO911 RESEARCH IN EPIDEMIOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

This course teaches students methods in conducting epidemiologic studies. Under mentorship of a faculty member, the student may continue research already started or participate in research in progress at USUHS. Prerequisites: PMO511, 512, Concurrence of Course Director

PMO926 HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION DIRECTED RESEARCH
1-12 Quarter Hours

Students undertake selected research projects emphasizing organizational and management studies and program evaluation. At times the project will include teaching a technique or methodology. More often the study will be an actual operational problem of a health agency. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director 1-12 Quarter Hours/Graded or Credit

PMO940 ENVIRONMENTAL/OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH DIRECTED STUDIES
1-12 Quarter Hours

The student will conduct an independent study project concerning some specific aspect of environmental health, industrial hygiene or occupational health under the close supervision of his/her academic advisor. This course is designed for students working independently to explore a defined topical area or problem or on their MPH year final academic project. Selected students may utilize this independent study option to expand their knowledge in selected subject areas relative to the MPH, or occupational medicine and general preventive medicine residencies. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO941 ENVIRONMENTAL/OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH DIRECTED RESEARCH
1-12 Quarter Hours

The student will conduct an independent research project in environmental and/or occupational health or industrial hygiene under supervision of his/her academic advisor. The research project will be designed to involve field studies, laboratory studies, and/or a policy study. A written report and an oral presentation will be required. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO942 ENVIRONMENTAL/OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH DIRECTED ROTATIONS
1-12 Quarter Hours

The student will gain relevant experience and specified knowledge, skills, and abilities while working closely with a mentor. The directed rotation will cover staff and technical functions of environmental/occupational health and/or industrial hygiene to include laboratory, field, and policy situations. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO960 DIRECTED LABORATORY RESEARCH
1-12 Quarter Hours

The student may elect a mini-project under the supervision of a faculty member. The aim of the directed research is to provide practical experience in laboratory methods and the acquisition of data of publishable quality. The graduate student will, with faculty review, design the study, conduct the experiments and data collection, do the appropriate analysis, including a literature review, and prepare an oral presentation and a written report. This directed research may be overseas. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO962 DIRECTED CLINICAL RESEARCH
1-12 Quarter Hours

A project under the supervision of a specified faculty member will be undertaken to meet the requirements of this directed clinical research course. The aim will be to provide practical experience in the clinical practice of medicine as it specifically relates to the tropics and to the development of research protocols that are related to the tropical condition. The graduate student will, with faculty review, design the study, conduct the experiments and data collection, do the appropriate analysis, including a literature review, and prepare an oral presentation and a written report. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO963 DIRECTED FIELD RESEARCH
1-12 Quarter Hours

The student may elect a mini-project under the supervision of a faculty member in a field study. The aim of this directed research is to provide practical field experience in epidemiological and clinical research. The graduate student will, with faculty review, design the study, conduct the experiments and data collection, do the appropriate analysis, including a literature review, and prepare an oral presentation and a written report. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO964 RESEARCH IN MEDICAL ZOOLOGY
1-12 Quarter Hours

Graduate students will conduct a project of original research under the supervision of a faculty member. The graduate student will, with faculty review, design the study, conduct the experiments and data collection, do the appropriate analysis, including a literature review, and prepare oral presentations and a written dissertation. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO970 DIRECTED STUDIES IN PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
1-12 Quarter Hours

The student will conduct an independent study project concerning some aspect of Preventive Medicine or Public Health. This course is designed for students working primarily on their MPH final independent project. Selected students will use this independent study project to expand their knowledge in a specific area of Preventive Medicine or Public Health. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO971 PMB DOCTORAL STUDENT JOURNAL CLUB
1 Quarter Hour

Each student in the class will read the selected scientific article and come prepared to discuss the salient points. A different student each week will present a current scientific paper published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and lead the discussion. PMB faculty will attend the weekly seminar and are encouraged to join in the discussion. The major objective of the course is to develop and refine critical reading skills, refine presentation skills, and acquire knowledge. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO972 CRITICAL THINKING SEMINAR
2 Quarter Hours

The course is designed to strengthen students' logical and critical skills in evaluating arguments and policies; considering and constructing alternatives; and developing reasonable, persuasive positions of their own. Students develop these skills in evaluating works in ethics, epistemology, literature, science, and mathematics in short written essays and during student-directed in-class discussions. Prerequisites: Concurrence of Course Director

PMO973 GENERAL PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND OCCUPATIONAL & MEDICINE RESIDENCY JOURNAL CLUB
1 Quarter Hour

Each resident physician in the class will read the selected scientific article and come prepared to discuss the salient points. A different resident each week will present a current scientific paper published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and lead the discussion. National Capital Consortium (NCC) Residency directors/deputy directors in OEM and GPM will also volunteer to lead the discussion during some sessions. PMB faculty members are encouraged to attend the weekly sessions and join in the discussion.

PMO975 INTRODUCTION TO AEROSPACE MEDICINE SEMINAR
2 Quarter Hours

This course will introduce students to the exciting, demanding, and unique challenges faced by those who live, work, and play in the aviation and space environment. Topics covered include the history of aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology and human factors, aerodynamics, clinical aviation medicine, operational aviation medicine, and accident prevention and investigation. The diverse practice settings of aerospace medicine in the military, NASA, FAA, and civilian sector will also be highlighted. Prerequisites: Permission of Course Director

PMO990 TRAVEL MEDICINE PRACTICUM
1-2 Quarter Hours

This clinically oriented lecture and clinic care course will teach and demonstrate the principles of travel medicine from the perspective of the tourist and the military unit. The course will consist of lectures, practical exercises, and preparation of travel clinic patients. The Travel Clinic at the National Naval Medical Center will be used to teach the clinical requirements for preparing tourists and business travelers of all ages and health states to travel safely abroad. Students will be introduced to multiple sources of travelers' health information, including travel medicine computer software, published sources, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preventive medicine will be emphasized, including the use of vaccines, personal protective measure, and malaria chemoprophylaxis. After travel evaluation and care will be introduced.

PMO991 ETHICS IN PUBLIC HEALTH
3 Quarter Hours

This course is based on the Ethics and Public Health model curriculum developed by HRSA and ASPH in 2003. In the introduction Jennings (2003) explains why the curriculum was created. Controversy produces and surrounds public health policy and interventions. The scientific considerations in Public Health blend with political and ethical conflicts. Central to PH practice are questions of autonomy, individual rights, coercion, justice, community, and multi cultural values. The goals that guide the curriculum are: Stimulating the Moral Imagination, Recognizing Ethical Issues, Developing Analytical Skills, Eliciting a Sense of Moral Obligation and Responsibility, and Coping with Moral Ambiguity. The course will enable students to recognize, analyze, criticize, and evaluate ethical issues in public health: and equip them with practical knowledge to construct arguments and make decisions in public health practice. It will begin with an overview that includes definitions and concepts for ethical dialog and philosophical approaches and models for ethical reasoning. This will be followed by focused discussions on historic and current public health issues and controversies. Lectures, case presentations with analysis, readings and online activities with written assignments will be used throughout the course. Course grade will be based on participation in class discussions, written assignments and classroom presentations and online activities.