Contact Information

Copyright Policy


Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Office of General Counsel
4301 Jones Bridge Road, C1094
Bethesda, Maryland 20814-4799
301-295-3028

Start with your Department Chair for initial guidance

Additional Guidance may be obtained through the Learning Resource Center (LRC) to determine what USU already has licensed

For general Copyright Law questions you may be directed to the Office of General Counsel (OGC)

FAQs about Copyright

Q. Can I distribute an article to my students that I just found on a website?
A.Yes, this situation is considered "spontaneous fair use." However, if you would like to use this article for this or another class next semester, you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holder.

Q.Everything on the Internet is "public domain," so I can freely distribute the information to my students, right?
A.No! Unless the web page specifically states that the information is not copyrighted, you must treat it as you would any other publication.

Q. Can I digitize and place charts, graphs, etc. from textbooks into my slide presentation for in-class lectures?
A.Yes, as long as you are not using more than 10% of the book and only for one course, one semester. No, if you are presenting this information in a symposium or presentation that you are preparing in advance. You will need to obtain copyright permission.

Q. Can I provide a link to other sites on the Internet from my website?
A.Yes, however, please be aware that links can move, so you may want to check your link frequently.

Q. Can I include abstracts from MEDLINE, PsychINFO, etc., without obtaining copyright permission?
A.No, abstracts are copyrighted, so you need to seek permission from the publisher.

Q. I wrote an article published in JAMA on my own time. Can I republish this article without obtaining copyright permission since I wrote the article?
A.No, you probably signed away your copyright as a condition of publication. Check with the journal’s publisher.

Q. I wrote an article published in JAMA on government time. Can I republish this article without obtaining copyright permission since I wrote the article?
A.Yes, you or anyone else can republish the article without obtaining permission from JAMA. Since the article was written on government time, it is a work of the U.S. government. Under current copyright law, works of the U.S. government are in the public domain and cannot be copyrighted by anyone.